New Art

High-brow art, low-brow art, somewhere in between brow-art. Hmmm. We wear our brows firmly on our face, thank-you. Oh, that’s a photorealistic line drawing of a cat riding a bicycle, you say. Right? No, well, it looks kinda cool so we’ll say it’s art anyway. And we’ll dig it more if it actually has some meaning.

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These surreal sculptures will change the way you look at the human body

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Art on Friday 12 December 2014

Am I seeing double, triple, or quadruple, even? Japanese sculptor Yoshitoshi Kanemaki creates surreal human figures that are bound to haunt your dreams. Using camphor wood and paint, he carves life-sized sculptures that have multiple features, from a woman with three sets of eyes, to another lady with at least eight heads. Sometimes he even […]

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We found a guy who can draw and paint just about anything he sees

Rachel Oakley Contributor

By Rachel Oakley in New Art on Friday 12 December 2014

While a lot of people have taken to cameras and smartphones to document their travels, Singapore-based artist Cherngzhi Lian takes out his pencils and watercolours to remember the sights and sounds of places. Cherngzhi ‘thinks of his artworks as a study of the world and humanity and uses it as a tool to comprehend the human […]

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Artist reimagines fungi specimens as cute plush toys and brooches

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Art on Thursday 11 December 2014

Vancouver-based artist Hine Mizushima has a knack for taking creepy, icky things and turning them into soft, plush, and huggable works of art. Take for example her collection of hand-stitched fungi specimens. Normally, these organisms are better left out in the wild or on someone’s kitchen chopping board, but thanks to Mizushima’s handiwork, they’re now […]

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It’s amazing how many birds this artist can ‘set free’ from just a single feather

Kenny Ong Contributor

By Kenny Ong in New Art on Tuesday 9 December 2014

You can’t help but be tickled by the feathery artwork of artist Chris Maynard. Using only a small scalpel as his key appliance, and possibly plenty of precision, he presents a vivid and different dimension of each feather; accentuating its inherent beauty and giving it a highly dynamic visibility.

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Take a flight of fancy with these fabric-ated birds of whimsy

Kenny Ong Contributor

By Kenny Ong in New Art on Tuesday 9 December 2014

Josephine Hague, who is trained in prop design and animation model making, crafted an aviary of delightfully whimsical birds clothed in bits of Japanese and vintage floral fabrics for her commissioned window display of London-based luxe leather designer, Bill Amberg. Seen up close, her creations seem to be chirping out a happy spring song with […]

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Animal sculptures look even better when they’re dressed in steampunk

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Art on Saturday 6 December 2014

Russian sculptor Igor Verniy creates sculptures of animals that are reminiscent of more post-apocalyptic times. Instead of having feathers or scales, his lifelike steampunk creations have bodies made of scrap metal, washers, and copper sheets. They’re also made to be fully articulated, able to pose in different positions just like their real-life counterparts. You can […]

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This self-taught Singaporean artist makes his drawings come alive on wooden boards

Kenny Ong Contributor

By Kenny Ong in New Art on Thursday 4 December 2014

Give Ivan Hoo some simple basic boards, coloured pencils, pastels and ink and the artist from Singapore will produce some breathtakingly real animals and everyday objects out of them. Even the water he draws seem to be trickling silently. Hoo prefers boards of wood to paper as he feels that the former gives the background a unique texture.

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These terracotta soldiers are bent on making the Qin Emperor cackle in his afterlife

Kenny Ong Contributor

By Kenny Ong in New Art on Wednesday 3 December 2014

When 8,000 terra cotta soldiers of the Qin Dynasty were discovered by some Chinese farmers in Xi’an in 1974, the world saw their stoic faces determined to protect their emperor in his afterlife. Well, the same emperor would be turning in his grave if he should see what San Francisco artist Lizabeth Eva Rossof has recreated of his terra cotta defense team.

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These snow drawings on a frozen lake are as expansive as a small town

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Art on Sunday 30 November 2014

A couple of years ago, we featured artist Sonja Hinrichsen, who treks through snow to create amazing, wide-ranging patterns on the freezing landscape. Well, she’s back. And her artworks are even better – not to mention bigger – than ever. Called Snow Drawings at Catamount Lake, Hinrichsen’s latest work involved some 60 volunteers trampling miles […]

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Painting masterpieces, without their well known characters

Rachel Oakley Contributor

By Rachel Oakley in New Art on Saturday 29 November 2014

Imagine Leonardo da Vinci’s The Last Supper masterpiece, without Jesus and his disciples. Or Botticelli’s The Birth of Venus without Venus and her iconic cheer squad. Spanish artist José Manuel Ballester has given his favourite masterpieces a bit of an update by taking away their iconic characters, leaving an eerie scene in their wake. If you’re […]

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This is how famous artists would plate Thanksgiving meals

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Art on Friday 28 November 2014

We knew food presentation is an art form, but this is taking it too literally! In her series ‘Thanksgiving Special’, San Francisco-based artist Hannah Rothstein visualizes what it would be like if famous artists plated Thanksgiving meals. With different Thanksgiving entrees as her medium, she rearranges them to look like the signature styles of iconic artists like Jackson Pollock, Piet Mondrian, Andy Warhol, and Vincent Vang Gogh, among others.

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Less known historical characters who have ‘unleashed’ great creativity: Clyfford Still, the pioneer of the abstract impressionist movement

Rachel Oakley Contributor

Presented by Microsoft_PresentedBy

By Rachel Oakley in New Art on Thursday 27 November 2014

Abstract expressionism is mentioned and you immediately think of artists such as Jackson Pollock or Wassily Kandinsky. But there’s one painter who was the leader of the movement but who never really got the fame and glory he deserved: Clyfford Still.

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Artist lets public stick chewing gum all over giant sculpture of himself

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Art on Wednesday 26 November 2014

We’re not pulling your leg. Stick gum on this sculpture and you won’t get in trouble, you’ll even be considered an artist! ‘Gumhead’ is a seven-foot black, resin and polyester sculpture of artist Doug Coupland. The interactive piece was created to engage the public in transforming its original design using chewing gum. And by the […]

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Amazing 3D tattoos so realistic they’ll creep you out!

Kenny Ong Contributor

By Kenny Ong in New Art on Wednesday 26 November 2014

As tattoos become more popular and mainstream, the onus is on tattoo artists to introduce new and exciting styles for them and their customers to stand out, far from the madding crowd. Our friends at Bored Panda have curated some tattoos that give an extra edge of optical illusion, so realistic they are that you […]

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Human skin is beautifully manipulated, and it’s all done without photoshop

Rachel Oakley Contributor

By Rachel Oakley in New Art on Tuesday 25 November 2014

Dutch artist Juuke Schoorl likes to explore the aesthetic possibilities of skin, and it might be hard to believe but these are all created without any Photoshop work. Her graduation project is known as ‘REK’ which means ‘stretch’ in Dutch, and it illustrates Schoorl’s fascination with the human body and the ways it can be […]

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