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Architecture

IKEA’s latest flat-pack is an entire freakin’ farm, ready to use in your apartment

Growing fruit, veggies and herbs in your own little garden sounds like a really lovely, quaint idea, but in practice it seems completely impractical if you don’t have a plot of land – or, at the very least, a decent-sized backyard.

Were only there some kind of flat-pack way of making the most of your space to allow you to grow all the fresh produce you wanted.

You see where we’re going with this – and perhaps you’ve already guessed who came up with the solution.

In 2016, IKEA opened Space10, their “secret innovation lab” (that’s so secret is has it’s own website), aiming “to explore and design innovative and responsible business models for the future that enables a more meaningful and sustainable life for the many”.

One of their early successes has been The Growroom, “spherical urban farm that enables people to grow their own food right on their doorstep”.

The Growroom measures 2.8 by 2.5 metres, which is small enough to fit in most inner-city home environments, while the design allows for both water and sunlight to reach all levels of the ‘farm’, whether it be at the top or bottom of the sphere.

And while IKEA built their reputation on selling products that don’t break the bank, The Growroom takes affordability to the next level, being a piece of open-source design, allowing anyone to download the plans for free and create their own.

“We hope to see The Growroom appear in every city in the world,” said Simon Caspersen, communications director of Space10.

“We believe that local food production represents a serious alternative to the global food model.”

The project was designed by architects Sine Lindholm and Mads-Ulrik Husum, with Lindholm saying their aim was “to generate poetic spaces with a sense of tranquility”.

Of course, before that tranquillity is created, there will probably be a bit of noise from all the cutting, sawing and hammering of plywood.

About the author

Joe likes to write about himself in the third person, even if he thinks it’s horribly pretentious when others do it.

In partnership with our friends at Glenmorangie, Lost At E Minor presents the second episode in the We Are The World We Create podcast series, dedicated to celebrating those people, and their exceptional creations, that help make the world a more interesting place. In this episode, Bigsy speaks to Masterchef contestant, Reynold Poernomo, and street artist Brad “Beastman” Eastman, and delves into why dessert is everyone’s favourite course and how being a street artist can change how you perceive the world. Listen now!

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