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Australia’s magic island reveals its mythical disappearing lake

Following heavy rainfall in and around Hobart last week, which led to serious flooding in some areas, one of Tasmania’s most beautiful and rare sites has revealed itself again.

No, sadly it’s not the Thylacine – we haven’t seen one of those since last September – rather, it’s Disappearing Tarn, found on kunanyi / Mount Wellington.

So ‘tarn’ is one of those strange English words that you don’t see all that often, which dictionary.com defines as “a small mountain lake or pool”.

Hence, Disappearing Tarn does exactly what it says on the tin: it’s a small mountain lake that ceases to be visible.

But at the moment it’s visible. And it is truly a sight to behold.

According to a 2016 post from the official Tasmania Instagram account (which followed heavy rain and snow in the area), Disappearing Tarn is “the stuff of Tasmanian bushwalking folklore and a spot that many of Tassie’s keenest and most experienced walkers have searched for without luck”.

“This magical, aquamarine tarn, aptly named Disappearing Tarn, is said to occur only a handful of times a year, deep in the boulders of kunanyi / Mount Wellington,” the post continues.

“With its stunning waters and fleeting nature, it’s easy to see why the appearance of this picturesque pool is such an exciting discovery!”

It's long been the stuff of Tasmanian bushwalking folklore and a spot that many of Tassie's keenest and most experienced walkers have searched for without luck. This magical, aquamarine tarn, aptly named Disappearing Tarn, is said to occur only a handful of times a year, deep in the boulders of kunanyi / Mount Wellington. The fabled body of water was rediscovered by @TasTrails while exploring the Mountain after a bout of heavy rain and snowfall last week. With its stunning waters and fleeting nature, it's easy to see why the appearance of this picturesque pool is such an exciting discovery! Thanks for sharing this beautiful shot with us, Dylan! #DisappearingTarn #Tasmania #SeeAustralia #kunanyi #MountWellington #discovertasmania

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As for where you can find the tarn, it’s something of a mystery, although one of those mysteries that social media is helping to make far easier to solve.

“The water was definitely higher for sure [this time], but also as a sign of Tassie’s increasing popularity, there was about 30 people there,” keen bushwalker James Spencer told the ABC.

“Two years ago there was nobody there, it was just me and my mates.

“It’s interesting to see how much more popular it’s got as a result of word of mouth, exposure and Instagram and all of that,” he said.

It probably helps that Google Maps have got Disappearing Tarn marked as well – although their map doesn’t exactly come with a series of detailed instructions on how to hike there.

About the author

Joe likes to write about himself in the third person, even if he thinks it’s horribly pretentious when others do it.

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