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Aussie artist Beastman has launched his new series, The Human Intervention

Sydney-based artist Brad Eastman, also known as Beastman, is back with a new series which asks us to reflect on the future of nature.

The series, entitled The Human Intervention, ponders on humanity’s connections with nature, our role in it, and the potential future of our planet.

It’s through symbolic contemporary landscapes, seemingly captured from an aerial point of view, that the artist shows the complex interplay between man and nature, as well as the consequences of our actions.

In his artist statement, Beastman explains that he “does not seek to answer the question of our role in nature, instead, he invokes enquiry through the considered composition of key shapes and lines that resemble the manipulation of natural landscapes and environments.”

We recently spoke to Beastman to find out more about his latest work. Take a look:

This is a very forward-thinking body of work. Where did the initial spark for the overarching idea behind it come from?

“I have been making abstracted landscape paintings about the future of nature for a while now, and for this show I felt like it was important to attempt to project a message through the artwork and the exhibition.

“After living in Bali for the last few years, I visually see a lot of plastic pollution, especially while surfing and also in all the waterways leading to the ocean. These works are my visual response to human intervention with nature, particularly in coastal environments. The body of works all communicate the effect humans are having on natural landscapes, in both positive and negative ways, and also project a question to the viewer – what is the future of nature?”

Are you feeling positive or cautious about the future of Earth?

“I think everyone on this planet should be feeling cautious about the future of Earth, our human impact on the planet is more evident now than ever before, and will only become worse unless change is made. Nature is a resilient beast, and is extremely powerful, but it seems we are also, just in different ways. Our future generations depend on us now to put changes and methods in place to try and repair some of the damages made.”

Opening TONIGHT! @backwoods.gallery #thehumanintervention #beastman #bradeastman

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How inspired was this body of work by your surrounds in Indonesia?

“Being here for the last few years has definitely influenced my work, I don’t think I have ever had my physical location influence what art I am making until we moved over here. I am so much more connected to the ocean and nature over here than I was in Sydney.

“My works have definitely become more about real physical landscapes now, a direct response to my own surroundings, rather than being about more fictional and mythical concepts like my works were before.”

Beastman’s solo exhibition, The Human Intervention, is ongoing until 20 May 2018 at Backwoods Gallery, Melbourne. You can head on over here to find out more.

In partnership with our friends at Glenmorangie, Lost At E Minor presents the second episode in the We Are The World We Create podcast series, dedicated to celebrating those people, and their exceptional creations, that help make the world a more interesting place. In this episode, Bigsy speaks with Sons of the East about changing perceptions, rethinking the way you play an instrument, and what’s next for them. Listen now!

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