Stop The Violence uses bones to make a statement

Rachel Oakley Contributor

By Rachel Oakley in New Art on Wednesday 19 March 2014

It’s pretty obvious what Francois Robert is trying to convey with his Stop the Violence artwork. And it packs a punch. It’s an important series that “juxtaposes bones and iconic words/symbols that in some way or another have generated death and violence (i.e. wars, rifles, handguns, 9/11, knives, the KKK, etc)”. Robert says the skeleton […]

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So, the Nazis contemplated using mosquitoes to wage biological war

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Trends on Wednesday 5 March 2014

When, in Jan 1942, an entomological laboratory was opened in Germany’s Dachau concentration camp, the purported reason was to study lice and fleas that were ticking off soldiers. Apparently the institute also zeroed in on the feasibility of using mosquitoes in biological warfare to attack enemy soldiers with diseases such as malaria, according to Tübingen […]

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War Toys series inspired by drawings of children in war-torn areas

Rachel Oakley Contributor

By Rachel Oakley in Cool Travel, New Photography on Wednesday 13 November 2013

Using figurines he found as his model, California-based photographer Brian McCarty presents an ongoing project known as WAR-TOYS, where warfare is explored through the eyes of children. Started in 2011, this project saw McCarty travel to Gaza, Israel and the West Bank to focus on ‘the latest generation of Israelis and Palestinians that has never […]

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Iraq’s Museum of War Crimes (hardly a fun family trip)

Rachel Oakley Contributor

By Rachel Oakley in Cool Travel on Thursday 7 November 2013

Amna Suraka is one of the main tourist attractions for Sulaymaniyah, the cultural capital of Iraq. Here is where visitors are guided through prisons and interrogation rooms that were in use during Saddam Hussein’s rule, with many students, dissidents and Kurdish nationalists being imprisoned if they attracted attention of Baathist authorities of northern Iraq. The […]

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Make art, not war: 9000 bodies stenciled on beach for Peace Day

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Art on Tuesday 1 October 2013

Two UK artists, Jamie Wardley and Andy Moss, recently etched out 9,000 silhouettes on Normandy’s Arromanches beach to mark international Peace Day and pay tribute to both civilians and military officers who lost their lives during the Operation Neptune landing on June 6, 1944. The effect is both sobering and chilling. Stunning? Yes, stunning.

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Help Spencer Dale’s remarkable story come to light

Cormack O'Connor Contributor

By Cormack O'Connor in New Film on Tuesday 11 June 2013

When Australian Spencer Dale was 26 he travelled to Cambodia’s Phnom Penh, narrowly escaping capture by the communist Khmer Rouge fighters. After being rescued by General Norodom Chantaraingsey, the two shared an amazing friendship over the five following years which saw Dale fight in one of the bloodiest civil wars of modern times. Fourty two […]

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Evocative colour photos taken between 1914-1918

Cormack O'Connor Contributor

By Cormack O'Connor in New Photography on Tuesday 30 October 2012

A great series of color photographs taken between 1914 and 1918 have sprung up on one of our perennial favourite websites, Retronaut. The series offers a unique and interesting look at parts of France during the period of war: posed group shots, special candid shots and landscape and building photographs all make it into the series. Check out some of our favorites below.

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