SpiderTag: a Spanish street artist

Mareike Muller Contributor

By Mareike Muller in New Art on Friday 26 July 2013

SpiderTag is a Spanish street artist who always wanted to be a superhero when he was a little kid. So he found his own way to create that image: by producing spider-themed geometrical street art since 2008. SpiderTag is spinning his unique woolen webs in abandoned places all over the world.

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Surreal black-and-white photography by Chema Madoz

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Photography on Saturday 4 May 2013

Spanish photographer Chema Madoz seems to have a particular talent for shooting pictures that fuse seemingly disparate subjects in the most disconcertingly calm way. Nothing is what it appears to be at first glance — but it all makes sense when you look at the big picture.

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Spanish artist Eugenio Merino

Mareike Muller Contributor

By Mareike Muller in New Art on Friday 11 January 2013

Spanish artist Eugenio Merino makes a point with his ironic but humorous sculptures. Clearly influenced by the history of his own country, he’s found a way of dealing with it and at the same time exploring global issues like religion, war and poverty, always putting his finger on the tender spots. His work shows the sad side of this world´s society and politics in a most humorous way.

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Roberto Mollá

Shepard Fairey Reader Find

By Shepard Fairey in New Art on Sunday 18 January 2009

I bought three pieces of Spanish artist Roberto Mollá’s work at the recent Art Basel show in Miami, which we both exhibited at. He works on off-white graph paper, which immediately sets up this very firm grid, and then he paints these very graphic black and white patterns into certain areas of the composition. He also does larger things, like circles and teardrops of red paint, around which he works these incredibly meticulous pencil drawings in various styles. If a graffiti artist was also an impeccable illustrator, this is what the work would look like. It’s all based on a foundation of anatomy, but it’s drawing upon the style of traditional Japanese artwork at the same time. So in one of his pieces, for instance, there is a woman riding on a Koi fish with a screen design of trees behind her. The tension between all these elements is fascinating. At a glance they are graphically powerful, but then they also have this meticulous subtlety which is just beautiful.

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