Luke Jerram’s glass viruses and bacteria

Rebekah Rhoden Contributor

By Rebekah Rhoden in New Art on Thursday 31 January 2013

Luke Jerram makes exact glass replicas of harmful viruses and bacteria: SARS, HIV, E. Coli, and many more. Each replica is about 1,000,000 times the size of the actual virus/bacteria. Who would have though these nasty little organisms could look so beautiful?

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Sculptural forms bursting out of art frames

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Art on Saturday 26 January 2013

Baltimore-based artist Jonathan Latiano is interested in where things begin and end. Explains why a number of his artworks, like 2012’s Emerge, appear to be created at the exact place where 2D and 3D dimensions meet.

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Animal sculptures made from discarded furniture

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Art on Friday 25 January 2013

French sculpter Marc Sparfel twists and forms animal sculptures out of discarded furniture. They are equal parts whimsical and grand — especially the ones standing on their hind legs, looking like ancient Egyptian guards.

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3D paper sculptures by Maud Vantours

Rebekah Rhoden Contributor

By Rebekah Rhoden in New Art on Thursday 24 January 2013

Maud Vantours’s 3D paper sculptures are a great example of how complex a simple visual can be. Each piece is elegant and rhythmic, but the detail and precision behind the sculptures is just as impressive.

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Spanish artist Eugenio Merino

Mareike Muller Contributor

By Mareike Muller in New Art on Friday 11 January 2013

Spanish artist Eugenio Merino makes a point with his ironic but humorous sculptures. Clearly influenced by the history of his own country, he’s found a way of dealing with it and at the same time exploring global issues like religion, war and poverty, always putting his finger on the tender spots. His work shows the sad side of this world´s society and politics in a most humorous way.

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New art by Pard Morrison

Mareike Muller Contributor

By Mareike Muller in New Art on Thursday 3 January 2013

Colorado-based artist Pard Morrison explores the intersections of the analog and the digital world. His artwork, featuring image pixels placed in natural landscapes, remind you of ‘systems in a flux’ and the constant changes in technical innovations we’re going through.

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Matchstick sculptures by Ryan and Trevor Oakes

Rebekah Rhoden Contributor

By Rebekah Rhoden in New Art on Monday 24 December 2012

We’ve always been told not to play with matches, but I think there are exceptions to every rule. Like, when you can create amazing sculptures like Ryan and Trevor Oakes. These matchstick sculptures are impressive in volume alone, not to mention their beautiful details and form.

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Wall mounted reliefs by Ron van der Ende

Paul White Reader Find

By Paul White in New Art on Friday 21 December 2012

Ron van der Ende uses salvaged and reclaimed timber to create wall mounted reliefs of the stuff of our everyday, or at least the everyday we have left behind: classic cars, cassette tapes, planes, houses, stereo systems, spaceships and more. This is inventive and clever work.

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Pasta sculptures and more by Sinéad Foley

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Art on Monday 3 December 2012

Sinéad Foley has built some very cool sculptures, such as a DNA strand out of bamboo and bacterial cells out of pasta and splinters. Our inner geek is impressed.

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Anamorphic sculptures by Bernard Pras

Rebekah Rhoden Contributor

By Rebekah Rhoden in New Art on Monday 26 November 2012

Bernard Pras uses objects and materials he finds in landfills to create his incredible anamorphic sculptures. His sculptures are often recreations of famous works of art, but he puts his own unique spin on these classics with his amazing optical illusion stacking technique.

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Witty sculptures by Yarisal and Kublitz

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Art on Saturday 3 November 2012

We defy you to look at these awesome mixed-media sculptures by Berlin-based creative duo, Ronnie Yarisal and Katja Kublitz, without breaking out into a smile. From tiles falling out of a wall-hung carpet to a toilet pump pulling the needle-like thorns from a cactus with the power of a magnet (wittily termed ‘Domestification’), it’s impossible not to be charmed.

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Metal tree sculptures by KaiTree

Michele Banks Reader Find

By Michele Banks in New Art on Tuesday 25 September 2012

Artist KaiTrees keeps a low profile online, so not many people know about his incredible sculptures of trees, made of wires twisted together and then painstakingly pulled back apart. He posts some pictures of his work on Deviant Art and has a few available for sale at ArtFire It’s worth zooming in close to see the incredible level of detail.

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Antique sculptures go all 2012 fashion

Mareike Muller Contributor

By Mareike Muller in New Art on Tuesday 28 August 2012

What if the antique sculptures would start to feel uncomfortable being naked in public? That’s what the two French creatives Leo Caillard (photographer) and Alexis Persani (Art Director) asked themselves. The answer is: Street Stone, a photo series of digitally manipulated photos of the human sculptures at the Louvre dressed like fashionable Parisians.

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Large-scale sculptural work by Cybele Rowe

Katy Alexander Reader Find

By Katy Alexander in New Art on Saturday 9 June 2012

When I was 13 years old, I bought my first piece of art: a small clay sculpture, by Cybele Rowe. A sculptor for thirty years now, Rowe describes her process as ‘form-fishing’, and works in clay, bronze, plastic, fibreglass and wood. Last year, at the Ceramic Annual of America, she exhibited a large sculpture, constructed inside the gallery, with a performance component by a musician and dancer. On completion, the sculpture was pulled apart, and the unfired clay reused. ‘Art is hyperventilating. You hold your breath, you work really hard, and it’s euphoric’.

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Fruit and veggie skulls by Dimitri Tsykalov

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Art on Tuesday 15 May 2012

Paris-based Russian artist Dimitri Tsykalov has carved and crafted many things, from wood to meat. But some of his latest creations are deathly skulls from life-nourishing fruit and vegetables. This guy is quite something.

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