Moths fight bats with genitalia ultrasound

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Trends on Tuesday 9 July 2013

Really, PopSci writer Shaunacy Terro had us at ‘Tropical Moths Fight Bats With Blasts Of Ultrasound From Their Genitals’. The headline says it all better than we can. The hawk moth is this particular bat-offensive species and somehow, the ultrasounds defend them against bats — whether by startling the bats away in a language they […]

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Humans may grow beaks one day, says bio scientist

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Trends on Friday 5 July 2013

One of these days, science tells us, people won’t need teeth, they’ll grow pufferfish-like beaks instead. At least that’s what a biologist at Sheffield University believes. According to Dr Gareth Fraser, humans might just evolve to grow beaks — not unlike the ones sported by pufferfish — which are ‘far more robust and practical.’ How […]

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Soda vs. Meth: which is really worse for you?

Annie Churdar Contributor

By Annie Churdar in New Trends on Friday 21 June 2013

Which is worse for you, Soda or Meth? I know what my mum would say. But what does science have to say? According to a recent case study publicized in an issue of General Dentistry, Soda may actually be worse for you. Think about it. It rots your teeth, similar to the side-effects of Meth. But it also […]

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Get your selfie shot in space for just $25

Annie Churdar Contributor

By Annie Churdar in New Trends on Friday 21 June 2013

To raise money for the small Arkyd 100 space telescope via Kickstarter, three guys are offering you the chance to have a high resolution “selfie” photo with the earth in the background. Just pay the money and upload a photo of yourself. It’ll then be displayed on the Arkyd and the shot will be taken with our planet […]

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Unlucky line-up of Inventors killed by their own inventions

Annie Churdar Contributor

By Annie Churdar in Cool Websites on Friday 14 June 2013

Some inventors enjoy fame and glory. They become celebrities in their own right and go down in the history books as heroes. Well, that’s the goal, anyway. But there’s a whole collection of inventors who went down with their ships. Take Franz Reichelt, for example. This French tailor was testing his brand-new parachute invention by jumping […]

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Roaches go sugar-free to stay fit (and alive)

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Trends on Tuesday 4 June 2013

Cockroaches, apparently, are evolving so quickly, they’re skirting around sugar like the plague. Blame us humans for trying the same trick one time too many with sugar traps. This revelation came about when a team of scientists from North Carolina State University’s recently study on a strain of European roaches had them observed the roaches […]

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Victorian figures infiltrating scientific illustrations

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Illustration on Friday 24 May 2013

Collagist and book artist Lynn Skordal has a fantastic collage series, Scientific Re-Illustration, where prim and proper Victorian figures find their way into the droll world of detailed scientific illustrations. It’s all deliberately absurd and simply hilarious.

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Minimalist science posters by Kapil Bhagat

Annie Churdar Contributor

By Annie Churdar in New Art on Tuesday 7 May 2013

Kapil Bhagat created a whole series of these fantastic minimalist scientist posters for India’s National Science Day. Less is more, especially when it comes to poster design. But the key to keeping a minimalist poster from being boring is creating a little joke or pun. The “aha!” moment is when people fall in love with the design and Bhagat […]

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Extreme Environment Love Hotel: comes with added gravity

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in Cool Travel on Friday 12 April 2013

This whole love thing, it can be uplifting, or it can pull us down like gravity. Ai Hasegawa‘s Extreme Environment Love Hotel reimagines the love hotel as a centrifugal mechanism with Jupiter’s gravity, which is more than double (2.34 times, to be exact) of what we’re used to on Earth. This means, for instance, that […]

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Coffee drinks with clever nicknames

Eugenia Viti Reader Find

By Eugenia Viti in New Design on Thursday 11 April 2013

Do you ever find yourself at a coffee shop wondering what that attractive person ordered in front of you but you are too afraid to ask for fear of sounding uninformed and uncool? Well, have I got the solution for you. Check out this list of coffee drinks with clever nicknames. Try the Dirty Chai […]

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AM Phrenology Inkwell shows a map of your head

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Trends on Tuesday 9 April 2013

Hmm, we wonder how accurate this is. Phrenology, which was big during the Victorian period, basically refers to the study of the relationship between character and the shape of the skull. Doctor’s desks typically had a model of a head that segregated areas according to the senses these are associated with — with a inkwell […]

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Trippy photo-micrographs of testosterone

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Photography on Friday 29 March 2013

Brian Johnson photographed a testosterone melt specimen some years ago with the help of a Nikon Coolpix 4500 camera attached to a Leitz SM-Pol polarizing microscope. The bands and patterns from the crystal growth (yes, testosterone crystals) make for quite a psychedelic sight with all these blazing rainbow swirls of every colour imaginable. Possibly explains […]

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Splendid! Tattoos on people who love science

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Trends on Tuesday 19 March 2013

We stumbled across this fascinating project by science writer Carl Zimmer, who, in 2007, wondered on his blog if scientists were hiding tattoos of their science and got his answer from many of them — and yes they were. Science Ink basically is a pictorial trove of Zimmer’s favorite tattoos of science that span disciplines […]

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Quirky action sculptures by Roman Signer

Rebekah Rhoden Contributor

By Rebekah Rhoden in New Photography on Tuesday 12 March 2013

Swiss artist Roman Signer is part-mad scientist and part-artistic genius. His work is referred to as ‘action sculptures’, which are essentially combinations of science experiments and photography. His incredibly intriguing pieces are a unique take on the realm of experimental photography.

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Scientific data interpreted as baskets

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Art on Friday 1 March 2013

Just so happens that artist Nathalie Miebach was taking astronomy classes at Harvard and learning to weave baskets at the same time when it occurred to her that she could basically weave baskets to interpret data in a three-dimensional space. Since then, she’s translated all sorts of scientific data from astronomy, ecology and meteorology — […]

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