Do baboons really raise dogs as pets? Turns out, they can

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Eco on Wednesday 12 February 2014

Turns out baboons are kinda like the mafia of the animal world. The following video shows a baboon kidnapping a puppy from its mother, dragging it by its tail and giving it their own version of hospitality. Animal lovers beware, the first minute of the video is pretty heart-breaking to watch, especially when you hear […]

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Just thinking you’re getting good sleep can make your brain run better

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in Tech on Monday 27 January 2014

A bunch of researchers have found that participants who were told their sleep quality was below average performed significantly worse on brain performance compared to their peers. Included in the study was a verbal fluency test where participants scored way better when told their sleep quality was above average. Looks to be the case that […]

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Jesus has company: Malaysians walk on water, technically

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in Video on Friday 24 January 2014

Okay, before you scream ‘heresy!’ and ‘burn him at the stake’, hear me out. Malaysians walked, ran, danced, and did all sorts of physics-defying on top of a pool of water. But this isn’t your typical swimming pool. The pool had a non-Newtonian fluid of corn starch and water, called ‘Oobleck’. So technically they still […]

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Attention, all cat owners: Your cat thinks you are just an oversized cat

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Trends on Monday 20 January 2014

As if it wasn’t depressing enough to know that our feline pals aren’t really that attached to us, biologist Dr. John Bradshaw, who has over 30 years of experience in domesticated animal behavior, has revealed in his book Cat Sense that cats really think of their owners as a ‘larger, non-hostile’ cat. In other words, […]

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Look closely, these remarkable images are synapses in the brain

Rebekah Rhoden Contributor

By Rebekah Rhoden in Tech on Saturday 18 January 2014

These incredible psychedelic images are synapse maps of the human brain at work. The Human Connectome Project has been exploring the brain’s conenctions using a high-resolution map since 2010, and the project seeks to examine the brains of 1,200 volunteers to create a database of healthy brain structure. These images show the Human Connectome Project’s […]

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‘And the Ig Nobel Prize goes to…': Celebrating 2013’s most banal science discoveries

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Trends on Tuesday 22 October 2013

The Ig Nobel Prizes, which takes the mickey out of the real Nobel Prizes as genuine Nobel laureates present awards to those who have made the most banal breakthroughs in the world, is a brilliant, brilliant — and did we say ‘brilliant’? — affair. This year’s Probability Prize, for instance, deservingly went to a team […]

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Oxford University puts the Science of Kissing under the microscope

Rachel Oakley Contributor

By Rachel Oakley in New Trends on Thursday 17 October 2013

All in the name of science! Oxford University researchers have found that women are more likely than men to change their opinions of others after they kiss them. ‘Mate choice and courtship in humans is complex’, said researcher Robin Dunbar. ‘It involves a series of periods of assessments where people ask themselves, “Shall I carry […]

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Cam attached to clothing can capture calorie intake data in real time

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Products on Wednesday 16 October 2013

Lazy dieters who can’t be bothered to keep track of what they stuff in their mouth should love the fact that researchers from the University of Pittsburgh are now working on a tech invention — in the form of a tiny camera attached to their clothing — that can measure both food portions and calories […]

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Bat taxidermy: time-lapse from specimen to display

Annie Churdar Contributor

By Annie Churdar in Video on Wednesday 9 October 2013

This time-lapse video created by LSA’s Museum of Zoology walks us through the science of bat taxidermy. Don’t watch this if you’ve just eaten a heavy lunch. It’s a bit gross but highly fascinating and beautiful in a weird way. The bat skeleton is so delicate and detailed, like a piece of lace. I loved seeing […]

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Get drunk without drinking: Your guts might be making beer right now

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Trends on Wednesday 2 October 2013

We wish making beer straight from our guts was a sign of evolution and that we are all turning into super beings who produce what we consume — but no, auto-brewery syndrome (or gut fermentation syndrome) is really a health ailment. Barabara Cordell, the dean of nursing at Carthage’s Panola College, and Lubbock-based gastroenterologist Justin […]

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Messy desks? It’s a creative thing, we have scientific proof

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Trends on Saturday 28 September 2013

Researchers from the University of Minnesota have proven what we’ve known all along: folks with messy desks tend to be more creative. Three experiments were conducted, one of which stuck people in two environments, one neat and one grubby. The people in the grubby room were more likely to choose new stuff compared to their counterparts in the neat room — and we all know trying new things drives creativity.

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Bacteria make trippy art as they get social

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Art on Wednesday 25 September 2013

For his ‘Bacteria Art’ series, physics professor Eshel Ben-Jacob took bacteria colonies — thriving in his petri dish as raw material — and then introduced environmental challenges, so the micro-organisms could band together to use their collective social intelligence to solve these, as they inadvertently make art. How delightfully composed.

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The secret behind the best human lie detector in the world

Andrea DelBene Reader Find

By Andrea DelBene in New Trends on Thursday 22 August 2013

Dr Paul Ekman has spent 50 years studying facial micro expressions of people around the world, including the isolated Fore tribesmen in Papua New Guinea. Dr Ekman found that human emotions and facial expressions are universally understood and biologically innate: w use 43 facial muscles at each moment, whether we are conscious of it or not.

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Intergalactic Travel Bureau: For that trip to outer space

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Trends on Wednesday 7 August 2013

Now this is an unusual tourist information centre: one that helps you plan your next intergalactic space holiday. Well, sort of. We’re talking the Intergalactic Travel Bureau which popped up for a fortnight in July near Times Square, New York. The science-art project by Guerilla Science purports to offer options to tour the solar system, […]

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Incredible spherical Jupiter cake

Rebekah Rhoden Contributor

By Rebekah Rhoden in New Art on Tuesday 6 August 2013

Cakecrumbs is a Australian Zoology graduate’s food blog where blogger Rhiannon posts some of her creative culinary endeavors. Her Jupiter cake has become quite the internet sensation, and we can definitely see why. Her hand-painted spherical cake looks incredibly realistic, and it even has Jupiter’s characteristic Great Red Spot and distinct inner layers. Who knew […]

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