One photographer captures a forgotten brain collection at the University of Texas

Rachel Oakley Contributor

By Rachel Oakley in New Photography on Thursday 11 December 2014

It was while on assignment photographing for Scientific American at the University of Texas that Adam Voorhes discovered a forgotten collection of 100 brains, all preserved in jars of formaldehyde. After his discovery, Voorhes soon became obsessed with documenting them ‘to reveal their oddities, textures, and otherworldly essence’. Over three days, Voorhess and two others […]

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Looking for happiness? Science says listen to sad music: it works, really!

Nicole Hughes Contributor

By Nicole Hughes in News on Wednesday 5 November 2014

Happiness is the goal we are all in search of, right? But, of course, it can be fun to wallow in the sadness a bit. It’s often said you can’t have the good without the bad. But how can evoking negative emotions through music help us achieve happiness? Researchers Liila Taruffi and Stefan Koelsch at the Free University of Berlin did a study on the matter.

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Watch as a meteorite is captured on video exploding!

Rachel Oakley Contributor

By Rachel Oakley in New Eco on Wednesday 5 November 2014

Photographer Wes Eisenhauer has taken some pretty extraordinary footage of the night sky you’ll want to see. While filming a timelapse of the Milky Way Galaxy on October 16, Eisenhauer captured a fireball in the sky that seemed to spontaneously explode.

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Hey kids, this is what your brain looks like under the influence of psychedelic mushrooms

Nicole Hughes Contributor

By Nicole Hughes in News on Tuesday 4 November 2014

We’ve all seen the adds. A picture of your brain represented by a perfectly oval, not-cracked egg with the words, ‘This is your brain.’ Then, the next slide is a picture of eggs frying in a pan, ‘This is your brain on drugs.’

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These amazing chemical reactions will show you the true beauty of science

Rachel Oakley Contributor

By Rachel Oakley in New Eco on Thursday 9 October 2014

Even if chemistry isn’t your thing, and even if you fell asleep in almost every chemistry class, you’re sure to appreciate just how incredible science really is by watching this Beautiful Chemistry video. The video is a new collaboration between Tsinghua University Press and University of Science and Technology of China that make chemistry more interesting (and awesome) for the general public.

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The bizarre yet strangely awesome costumes of Comic-Con 2014 in photographs

Milo Sumner Contributor

By Milo Sumner in New Events on Saturday 26 July 2014

Comic-Con 2014 has officially kicked off at the San Diego Convention centre. For those who may never have heard of the phenomenon, Comic-Con is a bizarre yet strangely awesome annual event that brings together a whole host of peoples. From cos-players (those guys who get really really really into their costumes) to comic-book recluses, they […]

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This science teacher just proved that you can lose weight when you eat at McDonalds every day

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in Tech on Monday 7 July 2014

We’ve all either sniggered at, or know someone who’s sniggered at fast food giant McDonald’s as serving up food that’s not really food — so it might well be true, you could starve your body eating there. This was proven by John Cisna, a science teacher, who, curious to find out what would happen if he ate three square meals from McDonald’s every day, di that for 180 days and ended up losing over 60 lbs at the end.

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The Universe is big and you’re small but this animation should reassure you

Milo Sumner Contributor

By Milo Sumner in Video on Thursday 3 July 2014

It’s very easy to feel tiny and insignificant when you consider not only the immense mind-boggling size of the universe, but also the unfathomably long time that it’s been around for. You, me and everybody else are inconsequential specks on the vast plain of existence.

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Female-named hurricanes are more deadly because people don’t fear them as much as male hurricanes, says study

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Eco on Saturday 7 June 2014

According to a recent study by the University of Illinois and Arizona State University, hurricanes with female names have a higher death rate compared to those with male names. Why is this so? Because sexism! Examining the death rates from 1950 to 2012, it turns out that of the 47 most deadly hurricanes, female-named hurricanes averaged around 45 deaths compared to 23 deaths in male-named ones.  ‘[Our] model suggests that changing a severe hurricane’s name from Charley … to Eloise … could nearly triple its death toll’, the study says.

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What happens when you mix milk and Coke? Really weird stuff

Rachel Oakley Contributor

By Rachel Oakley in Video on Tuesday 27 May 2014

If you love science, or at least love to watch cool stuff, you’re in for a treat. This is the YouTube Coke and milk experiment. If you watch the video, you’ll see that once milk is poured into the Coke bottle, there is a strange reaction. Soon the colours of Coke and milk both separate, sediment appears at the bottom and the top half of the bottle contains a murky liquid one can only describe as dish water-esque.

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Adaptable 4D-printed material

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in Tech on Thursday 1 May 2014

The United States Army Research Office has given university researchers a grant worth $855,000 to develop the next generation of 3D printing – that is, 4D printing. Very original and mind boggling name, I know. The trio of researchers from Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of […]

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Is 3D printing the answer to sustaining life on the Moon?

Contributions Reader Find

By Jacob Paul Cherniayeff in Architecture on Thursday 10 April 2014

A consortium consisting of Italian space engineering firm Alta SpA, Pisa-based engineering university Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna and design firm Foster + Partners has been busy exploring the possibilities of 3D printing to construct lunar habitations. Addressing the challenges of transporting materials to the moon, the study is investigating the use of lunar soil, known as […]

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What if the human anatomy was part plants and animals?

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Art on Thursday 20 March 2014

What if our lungs were made out of flowers instead of, uhhm, lungs? Or what if our arteries were clogged with weeds instead of cholesterol? Or cactus for brains (which some people I know might already have)? Mixed media artist Travis Bedel uses glue and razor blades to cut out vintage illustrations from science books to create anatomical collages. He takes anatomical, botanical, and other biological parts and recombines them into figures that are both familiar and alien to us. His work range in size, from 5 inches to 6 feet.

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Really, animals like to get drunk too

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Eco on Monday 3 March 2014

It looks like humans are not the only species on Earth that love to get buzzed every now and then. In a new research published in the ‘Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences’, there seems to be a few little critters in the forest of Malaysia who hunker for alcohol. The study says that […]

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Study links cat bites to depressed people

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Trends on Saturday 1 March 2014

Apparently a team of researchers from University of Michigan and Virginia Tech, who drew from the electronic health records of a pool of 1.3 million patients to single out those with depression or bites for a study, found a strong link between cat bites and depression.

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