Architects of Air: an amazing walk-in light installation

Rebekah Rhoden Contributor

By Rebekah Rhoden in New Art on Wednesday 27 February 2013

Architects of Air is a collection of walk-in light installations inside specially-made inflated plastic buildings. The experience of walking through this amazing space is like being ‘somewhere between a womb and a cathedral’. The monumental light sculpture is based in Nottingham, UK, and has traveled across 38 countries where over 2 million people have experienced […]

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Geodesic dome by Kristoffer Tejlgaard and Benny Jepsen

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in Architecture on Thursday 21 February 2013

How beautiful! First, Danish architects Kristoffer Tejlgaard and Benny Jepsen deconstructed a dome to geodesic gorgeousness. Then they built one in Bornholm out of reclaimed wood and steel nodes. The project was commissioned by an interest organisation that represents 700 housing associations and manages almost 20% of Denmark’s residences. Alas, it is a temporary structure. […]

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North Korea’s Hotel of Doom: the worst building in the history of the world?

Rebekah Rhoden Contributor

By Rebekah Rhoden in Architecture on Wednesday 13 February 2013

Arguably the worst building in the history of the world, the unfinished Ryugyong Hotel has marred North Korea’s Pyongyang’s skyline for over 20 years. Looming over the city, the ominous pyramid serves as a reminder of the former Soviet presence in the city. Currently, Egyptian architects have resumed construction of The Hotel of Doom, enclosing […]

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World’s first 3D printed building is a loopy one

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in Architecture on Tuesday 12 February 2013

If this is the future of architecture, the future should be here in, oh, about 18 months. That’s how long the world’s first 3D printed building — Janjaap Ruijssenaars’ Landscape House where floors climb, flip and loop to become ceilings in a mobius strip — is estimated to be completed. The gigantic D-Shape printer will […]

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Singapore Hotel: the Parkroyal on Pickering

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in Architecture on Thursday 7 February 2013

Designed by Singapore’s architectural darlings WOHA, the Parkroyal on Pickering hotel in Singapore packs a maddening 15,000 square metres of gardens, waterfalls and vertical green walls into its premises. Seems legit, then, that it is hailed as a ‘hotel in a garden’. The endless cascading tiers are inspired by Bali’s rice terraces, while, within the hotel’s eco-luxe confines, everything adds up to form a rather impressive sum of the total: marble walls that appear to flow like water, plucky birdcage-shaped cabanas that overlook the infinity pool and playful shadows cast by trees silhouetted against mood lights at night.

Let’s not forget the green measures in place too — that includes harvesting rain, harnessing solar power and making good use of sensors to conserve both energy and water.

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One Cubic Foot by David Liittschwager

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Art on Tuesday 5 February 2013

For his work on One Cubic Foot, photographer David Liittschwager took a green 12-inch metal frame cube all over the world — such as New York’s deciduous Central Park and the coral reefs of French Polynesian island Moorea — and started recording the rich biodiversity of creatures that inhabited and moved through each cube. A […]

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Amazing abandoned igloo hotel in Alaska

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in Architecture on Tuesday 29 January 2013

Developed in the 1970s, the massive four-storey Igloo City Hotel in Alaska has changed owners several times. The surreal piece of architecture remains to be fully constructed to this day, but we suspect no one from Cantwell, the nearest town 20 miles away, is complaining.

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Shan-Shui City: city of mountains and water

Cormack O'Connor Contributor

By Cormack O'Connor in Architecture on Thursday 24 January 2013

Architect Ma Yansong has designed a whole new city in China that towers into the sky like a beautiful mountain range, symbolizing nature as an abstraction of reality. With a built-in waterfall and connecting bridges, the towers, dubbed Shan-Shui City (‘the city of mountains and water’), are a place for people to work, socialize and live.

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Cat Tube, a feline-friendly transportation system

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Design on Monday 21 January 2013

Haha, this is ingenious. First, architecture design firm Because We Can turned an underutilized room in their client’s San Francisco home into a mad scientist workshop. Next, they added a Cat Transit System to it, which lets cats travel all over the desks and around three of the four walls. There are even viewing points and secret access points for, you know, times when the feline commuters need to be sneaky or do a bit of spying. Fun stuff.

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The shipping container: now a 3-storey house

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in Architecture on Saturday 19 January 2013

Here’s how to reinvent container blocks: turn it on its side and make it a three-storey house. This ingenious reimagining, Homebox, is by University of Hanover professor Han Slawik who made a wooden version with the same dimensions to run on the same transport system of shipping containers.

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E’terra Samara treehouse resort in Canada

Rebekah Rhoden Contributor

By Rebekah Rhoden in Architecture on Friday 18 January 2013

In Canada’s Bruce Peninsula forest, Farrow Partnership studio designed a five-star eco-friendly resort called E’terra Samara. These twelve beautiful treehouse villas are nestled harmoniously amidst the natural landscape. The dynamic shape of the treehouses wrap around the trees in a complementary way.

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170 foot long trampoline track in a Russian forest

Maria Niarchos Reader Find

By Maria Niarchos in Cool Travel on Thursday 17 January 2013

If you could make the drive to work a thing of the past by jumping your way along a massive trampoline, you’d do it, right? Salto Architects decided it’d be a damn good idea to try out, installing a 170 foot long trampoline track in a Russian forest. The brains behind the design had a bigger plan that just installing a whole heap of fun, though. Renowned for blurring the different levels of architecture, Salto set out to challenge the concept of infrastructure that shows an ignorance to its surroundings. They wanted to evoke a conversation; new thoughts about the way we move. Bigger-picture-thinking, lawsuits and insurance aside, I’m sold on the whole ‘hop, skip and a jump’ thing.

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The incredible Looping Bridge in Sarajevo

Mareike Muller Contributor

By Mareike Muller in Architecture on Thursday 17 January 2013

Bojan Kanlić, Adnan Alagić and Amila Hrustić had to wait for five years until the bridge they designed for a competition while studying at the Academy of Fine Arts in Sarajevo was built. Festina Lente, or for those who don’t speak Latin, ‘Make haste, slowly’, is the name of this extraordinary construction that spans 38 meters over the Miljacka river. The idea of this steel bridge with an aluminium trim and glass fence is to create a symbolic gate and a balance between the left and the right side. One could say that the three Bosnian product designers did this very, very well.

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Rainbow igloo built from colourful bricks

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in Architecture on Saturday 12 January 2013

Haha, this is great. A kiwi student who visited his girlfriend in Canada during winter break ended up building an igloo out of 500 or so coloured water bricks in her family’s backyard, because her mum wanted one. It took many empty milk cartons, over 150 hours and tenacity against the subzero temperature. Well, at […]

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Shipping crate opens up to a posh house

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in Architecture on Saturday 12 January 2013

Insane, that’s what this is. Thanks to the sharp-eyed folks of My Modern Met, we’ve just discovered the Push-Button House by architect Adam Kalkin. Basically the walls of a shipping crate completely flip open via hydraulic action into a pretty impressive living space. The only bummer is that it’s not an actual house but an installation. Then again, who says we can’t daydream? Already, Kalkin is working on a follow-up to the Push-Button — dubbed Push-Button House 2 — which will be expanded to a five-room room for even more room for greatness.

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