Show us some skin: sculpted skin furniture by Jessica Harrison

Rachel Oakley Contributor

By Rachel Oakley in New Art on Thursday 19 December 2013

Don’t worry, this isn’t real human skin, or so she tells us. ‘Persuaded by a fascination in human anatomy and bodily functions,’ UK-based artist Jessica Harrison is raising eyebrows everywhere with her miniature pieces of furniture made with casts from her own skin. There’s a whole set of home furniture in her collection, including a […]

Read more

Exploding modern art paintings by Katy Moran

Simon James Reader Find

By Simon James in New Art on Friday 14 June 2013

I like art that collapses a lot of stuff together as subtly as possible. Katy Moran’s paintings do exactly that. Her recent show at Dublin’s Douglas Hyde Gallery was just stunning. These paintings are like watching the Museum of Modern Art implode in a tiny soundproof box. Heavy on the abstraction but whipped up light […]

Read more

Mesmerizing video art pays tribute to the Japanese nuclear meltdown

Sarth Reader Find

By Sarth in New Art on Friday 15 February 2013

Any time a piece of abstract art can make me feel uncomfortable, I want to talk about it. And this one mesmerizes, too. Kazumasa Teshigawara made this experimental website/video-art piece in response to the nuclear meltdown in Japan (remember that?) and I love the rest of his video art as well. Big ups to the […]

Read more

Abstract drawings by John McLaughlin

Contributions Reader Find

By JM in New Art on Tuesday 4 September 2012

John McLaughlin’s paintings and drawings are part of his own lineage of abstraction that has evolved over some twenty five years. McLaughlin’s work has always arisen from an earnest search for resolution in a range of gestures, movements and erasures. The appearance and meaning of the resolution has developed in the meandering progression of the creative process.

Read more

MONA’s Theatre of the World in Hobart

Zac Editor

By Zac in New Art on Tuesday 10 July 2012

The Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) in Hobart, Tasmania, has been on the Lost At E Minor radar for some time. So we were delighted to be invited to attend the opening of the Theatre of the World exhibition.

Read more

Marla Olmstead, an eight year old art prodigy

Zolton Editor

By Zolton in New Art on Thursday 8 January 2009

I watched the controversial documentary last night, My Child Could Paint That, which looked at the then four-year old art ‘genius’, Marla Olmstead, who was already exhibiting regularly (and selling her works for thousands), despite her age and the questions that were being repeatedly raised about the influence her rather ambitious father might have been having on her artwork. It was fascinating to watch, both for the trainweck story plots which hijacked its generally reverential tone, and for the process by which Olmstead was creating her vibrant, colourful, and exciting modern art pieces. Apart from anything else, the documentary raised important questions about what actually constitutes ‘good’ art and why some art sells for so much more than others. It’s all subjective, of course, but the outcry that greeted claims of third party interference in her paintings (a claim which has been noticeably muted over the years) suggests that it’s often less about the work itself than about the story or personality behind the artist who created it. Either way, Marla Olmstead is now eight years old, is still painting, and is selling her work for remarkable amounts. If you have a spare thirty thousand dollars or so, this piece above is apparently still available. So crack open that well fed piggy bank and get some modern art on your walls.

Read more (111 comments)

close

Like us on Facebook

Don't show this again - I already like Lost At E Minor