Microscopic Mayhem: terrifying microscopic images of everyday mites

The Flying Dutchman Reader Find

By The Flying Dutchman in New Photography on Thursday 17 April 2014

Don’t look too close, you might not like what you see. That’s what these wonderful terrors boil down to. Microscopic images of creatures found all around us, all over us and often inside us will probably send some on a spiral of germophobic OCD, while others among us will no doubt grab a sketch pad […]

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Stunning photo shows what dust really looks like

Rebekah Rhoden Contributor

By Rebekah Rhoden in New Photography on Tuesday 8 January 2013

This incredibly colorful photograph just happens to be … you guessed it, dust! Particles of hair, natural and synthetic fibers, insect scales, pollen, and more make up this fascinating picture. Photographed by Brandon Broll, thus images is just one of many amazing microscopic photos in his book, Microcosmos, in which random things are magnified by between 22 times and 22 million times. See other images below that show what cauliflower, strawberries, mushrooms, and other things look like under Broll’s camera. [via The Sun UK]

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Best microscope photographs of 2012

Rebekah Rhoden Contributor

By Rebekah Rhoden in New Photography on Friday 28 December 2012

These incredible microscope photographs are some of the winners of Olympus Bioscapes Digital Imaging Competition. The contest consisted of almost 2,000 photographs hailing from 62 countries. Each image is stunning in its own way, and it just goes to show that sometimes the smallest things can be the most fascinating.

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Pollen, seeds and fruit under the microscope

Cormack O'Connor Contributor

By Cormack O'Connor in New Art on Tuesday 11 December 2012

If you’re a photographer and you like to get really, really close to things we may have found you someone new to aspire to. British professor and photographer Rob Kesseler is taking macro to a whole new level with his latest series of photographs that look at nature under a microscope.

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