Lei Lei: old school video game inspired art

Jo Mo Reader Find

By Jo Mo in New Design on Friday 16 November 2012

I came across Chinese animator Lei Lei about a year ago and I was instantly drawn to his old-school computer game inspired animations and use of jazzy intricate colorful patterns. His mix of hand-drawn illustrations and computer graphics were a refreshing change from the highly polished HD quality animations some people are geared towards. And they justified multiple viewings immediately.

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Photo collages blend modern Shanghai with traditional art

Alison Zavos Contributor

By Alison Zavos in New Art on Tuesday 6 March 2012

Yang Yongliang is a young photographer and artist from Shanghai. For ten years he studied traditional Chinese painting and calligraphy which have greatly influenced his work. His photo collages combine elements of traditional Chinese art with modern life in Shanghai. [via Feature Shoot]

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Jee-Shaun Wang

Gerry Mak Reader Find

By Gerry Mak in New Illustration on Saturday 28 January 2012

A lot of Baltimore-based illustrator/artist Jee-Shaun Wang’s work involves intricate drawings made to look like prints. I love how intricate and lyrical his images are and the way he effortlessly and seemlessly draws together elements of graphic novels, folk art, and mythic Chinese aesthetics.

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Landscape photos resemble traditional Chinese paintings

Alison Zavos Contributor

By Alison Zavos in New Art on Thursday 5 January 2012

Chinese born Don Hong-Oai spent most of his life in Saigon, where he apprenticed with a photography studio. He stayed in Vietnam through the war, before fleeing by boat to California in the late 1970s. While living in San Francisco, he went back to China every few years to create new negatives. He remained largely unknown until the final years of his life when he was finally discovered by the wider public. He died in 2004.

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Chinese artist Liu Bolin makes himself become invisible

Zolton Editor

By Zolton in New Art on Friday 10 June 2011

Who said becoming invisible was impossible? Well, whoever it was was that crushed our childhood fantasies never got around to Chinese artist, Liu Bolin, who is able to camouflage himself deeply amongst any surroundings. His art is intended as a protest against the persecution of artists by the Chinese government, and each photo takes him some ten hours to stage.

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Papercut Lashes

Clare Hillier Reader Find

By Clare Hillier in New Design on Tuesday 18 May 2010

Inspired by the traditional Chinese craft of paper-cutting, these lashes by Paperself are as intricate as they are delicately pretty. Available in three styles — horses, peonies and peach blossoms which symbolise success, happiness and love respectively.

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Yue Minjun

Gerry Mak Reader Find

By Gerry Mak in New Art on Wednesday 27 January 2010

Yue Minjun, one of the originators of the Cynical Realist movement in contemporary Chinese art, has been applying his iconic grinning face to various forms and materials for decades, but his recent series, Colorful Running Dinosaurs — consisting of metallic humanoid dinosaur sculptures — takes his work to an interesting place where mythology, pop culture, and the contradictory aspects of the Chinese zeitgeist converge.

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Deanne Cheuk in Beijing

Zolton Editor

By Zolton in Cool Travel on Saturday 23 August 2008

New York-based designer, and sometime Lost At E Minor contributor, Deanne Cheuk visited Beijing prior to the Olympics as part of the New Grand Tour. We touched in with her to see how she found the experience of being over there: ‘we visited some really modern art galleries, which seemed to be on par with with the best galleries in New York City’.

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The pre-revolution artwork of Xiaoqing Ding

Gerry Mak Reader Find

By Gerry Mak in New Art on Tuesday 19 August 2008

New York-based artist Xiaoqing Ding’s work draws from traditional Sung Dynasty scroll paintings as well as from more recent forms, her figures looking as much like the cherubic babies in festive Chinese New Year art (known as Nian Hua) as they do the sultry flappers in cigarette ads in 1930s Shanghai. Her images have an ethereal and slyly erotic quality, referencing Chinese mythology, pre-revolution film, and subtly personal narratives.

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Davi Russo on The New Grand Tour

Zolton Editor

By Zolton in New Photography on Saturday 2 August 2008

We interviewed Suitman a few weeks back, getting his perspective on The New Grand Tour he set up which saw a hand-picked group of American artists tour China to take in the cultural renaissance going on there. Photographer Davi Russo was a part of the tour, so we spoke to him about his experiences. Were you surprised by how dynamic the Chinese art scene is, given the rather conservative regime in power there? ‘This could be a two sided answer from me. I was able to see some contemporary photography inside some of the galleries I visited at 798 Area. I must say, there were a few times that I was extremely impressed, and somewhat even a little jealous to see the context of young emerging work being supported in Beijing. I would also say that after being introduced, I became a huge fan of and contributer to the photography being published in VISION magazine, which I think is something of a gem in China now’.

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The New Grand Tour

Zolton Editor

By Zolton in New Trends on Saturday 12 July 2008

I interviewed the mysterious Suitman some time ago for the Australian magazine, Riot. Even then it was clear that, with his immaculately pressed suit and crisp white shirts, he was an icon – both stylistically and conceptually. So it’s no surprise to hear about his latest adventure, The New Grand Tour, ‘an episodic art project featuring revolving guest artists with hyphenated cultural and geographical backgrounds.

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