New Eco

Our eco finds bring you a modern, inspiring twist on new ideas and green trends. Eco products, eco designs, movements are the new oasis in the urban jungle. Green is no longer a colour; it’s a lifestyle which is sustainable, energy efficient and smart. We have the latest eco finds. Trust us.

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Stunning aerial photos show the meetings of two or more bodies of water

Marta Millere Contributor

By Marta Millere in New Eco on Tuesday 20 May 2014

Our planet doesn’t cease to surprise us, even when it does something like pictured in these photos. These rivers are for real; they’re not polluted, they are confluences, as in, meetings of two or more bodies of water, be it two rivers or canals.

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It’s official: Cats are the new goats

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Eco on Thursday 15 May 2014

To be more specific, lynx — a species of wild cats — are the new goats. YouTube user Kevin Forrester captured some curious footage of a pair of lynx yelling at each other like, er, goats yelling like humans. As Mara Grunbaum said of evolution in her upcoming book WTF Evolution, ‘You were doing so […]

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Have you seen the Zonkey? It’s a cute donkey with striped zebra legs

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Eco on Monday 5 May 2014

A zonkey called ‘Khumba’ — the offspring of a female zebra and a make donkey — was born this week at a zoo in Northern Mexico. It looks like it’s wearing stripey stockings, but it’s all natural, baby. Our next question is: if a tiger mates with a cheetah, would the baby’s name be ‘Fashion […]

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If all the humans piled up in the Grand Canyon, it would look like this

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Eco on Friday 2 May 2014

If all living, breathing humans today – around 7.159 billion – would pile up in the Grand Canyon for no apparent reason, it would look something like this. Kinda like those zombies in World War Z. If you thought the pile up is massive, it’s actually not. There’s not even enough of us to fill […]

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Oh, just a baby black bear rock-climbing a canyon with his mama

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Eco on Thursday 1 May 2014

While kayaking at the Big Bend National Park earlier this March, Stephanie Latmer spied a Mexican black bear cub courageously scaling the walls of the Santa Elena Canyon with his baby paws to follow his mama bear. It’s a great reminder of why bears are so effortlessly cool. [Watch the remarkable video here]

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‘Sargassum!’ A device that translates dolphin whistles into English

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Eco on Wednesday 30 April 2014

Dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, who has been studying the communication system of a pod of dolphins along the Bahamas off southern Florida with the Wild Dolphin Project for 29 years, has been amassing and using the dolphin’s signals back at them to see if humans and dolphins can find a way to communicate. After some […]

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Adorable baby great white shark gets our vote for human-shark peace

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Eco on Friday 25 April 2014

It sounds like an oxymoron, but even massively huge great white sharks all have to start small as, well, shark babies. Steve McNicholas snapped this photo of a young nippy one getting released back into the sea off Santa Monica beach by California State University’s Dr Chris Lowe. Presumably this was from a scene in […]

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This Easter Snake is THE most adorable thing ever

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Eco on Wednesday 23 April 2014

Canadian DevianART user ‘NocturneJewel’ was visited not by the Easter Bunny, but by something a million times more awesome: the Easter Snake! The pet snake is a leucistic Texas Rat Snake (Pantheropis obsoletus) and goes by the name Crescent. She’s about 9 years old, over 4 feet long, and loves hiding swallowing all your Easter eggs – and probably the Easter Bunny as well.

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Fact: Fish with human teeth actually exist

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Eco on Tuesday 22 April 2014

The Pacu, a curious sort of South American freshwater fish, recently made headlines last year as a ‘testicle eating fish’ when it surfaced in Papua New Guinea and gnawed the balls off a couple of fishermen. The most remarkable thing about it has to be its incredibly human teeth. Yes, fish with human teeth. Sometimes […]

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These are some of the oldest organisms on Earth, in photographs

Rachel Oakley Contributor

By Rachel Oakley in New Eco on Friday 18 April 2014

Next time you complain about aging, have a thought for these incredible organisms! Since 2004, Brooklyn-based artist Rachel Sussman has researched, collaborated with biologists and ‘braved some of the world’s harshest climates from Antarctica to the Mojave Desert in order to photograph the oldest continuously living organisms on Earth’. So what does this collection include? […]

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Trees that swallowed abandoned WWII equipment

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Eco on Friday 18 April 2014

During the ‘Siege of Leningrad’ in WWII, the Neva Bridgehead (or Nevsky Pyatachok) was a vital and strategic site for both the Germans and Russians. For the German army, it served as a staging area for their impending advance on Leningrad. For the Russians, it was a crucial place to reopen land communications with the […]

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Erm, what’s more sensitive to a bee sting: a penis or a nostril?

Marta Millere Contributor

By Marta Millere in New Eco, New Trends on Thursday 17 April 2014

People do the craziest things in the name of science, love or their country. Back in the 1980s, Justin Schmidt, decided to take it up a notch and measure pain. He must have woken up one morning and decided that it was up to him to endure 25 bee stings to understand which part of a human body is the most sensitive to pain.

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The oldest scrap of Earth crust is a glimmering crystal (from an Aussie sheep station)

Rachel Oakley Contributor

By Rachel Oakley in New Eco on Thursday 17 April 2014

This incredible crystal has been confirmed as the oldest fragment of Earth’s crust. Aged at 4.4 billion years, this zircon was found in sandstone in the Jack Hills region of Western Australia. Scientists studied its uranium and lead atoms, and a decaying process over time allows scientists to arrive at the 4.4 billion number. But […]

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Shades salvaged from skateboards

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Eco on Monday 14 April 2014

Wow, skateboarding-loving duo Jon Winfrey and Ryan Vecchiarelli, the guys behind Colorado-based operation Eqo Optics, actually salvage old and battered skateboards to give them a second stab at life in the form of polished colorful sunnies with glare-free polarized lenses. Too cool for words.

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Photographer shoots wild meerkats, gets climbed on and used as lookout post instead

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Eco, New Photography on Friday 11 April 2014

Tree-climbing goats, move over now. Photographer Will Burrard-Lucas was minding his own business in the Makgadikgadi Pans region of Botswana and shooting away at meerkats, when, one day, the meerkats — including a three-week-old litter of babies — decided he could be trusted and would make quite a decent vantage point.

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