New Eco

Our eco finds bring you a modern, inspiring twist on new ideas and green trends. Eco products, eco designs, movements are the new oasis in the urban jungle. Green is no longer a colour; it’s a lifestyle which is sustainable, energy efficient and smart. We have the latest eco finds. Trust us.

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The glacier in Antarctica that gently weeps blood

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Eco on Monday 7 July 2014

Just look at this. In Antarctica’s Taylor Glacier, an oxygen-poor salty lake sits under 1,300 feet of ice, where the brine-like water occasionally gushes forth to flow down the glacier slope. The iron-rich water quickly oxidises upon meeting air to turn deep red — making the glacier look like it got stabbed or something. Apparently, […]

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You genuinely won’t believe why this community wouldn’t drink clean water

Tristan Rayner Editor

By Tristan Rayner in New Eco on Friday 4 July 2014

Clean water. Something that, if you’re reading this, you probably take for granted. Deliciously granted. But as most people know, we’re lucky to have access to abundant clean water at very low cost. But if you were given clean, clear water for the first time, what would you think?

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Is this furry critter a soft toy or an insect?

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Eco on Wednesday 2 July 2014

What is this: a plush toy or an extra-furry insect? Duh, the latter. The Rosy Maple Moth, which, as its name suggests, feast on maples. They also have cartoon-like red or pink legs and antennae, yellow bodies and hind wings, plus pink forewings with yellow triangles across the middle. The North American moth has males […]

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Aw, this Shiba Inu dog might just be the happiest dog alive

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Eco on Monday 30 June 2014

Step aside, Boo. Is this the happiest, most photogenic canine in the world? Perhaps. Seven-year-old Maru, a Shiba Inu dog from Japan, looks like he’s beaming all the time, whether he’s sitting in a playing with kids, smelling the flowers or rolling over on his back to take a cat nap. That look of happiness […]

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Fact: Wolves can communicate by eyeballing each other

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Eco on Monday 30 June 2014

So it looks like wolves don’t just howl to make themselves heard to other wolves: they pick up and exchange communication cues just by looking at each other. Wow. Japanese researchers, who watched the interactions of canid species in zoos, concluded that those with eyes that were easier to see were more likely to be social.

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Furry Two-Face chimera cat is bewitchingly beautiful

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Eco on Friday 27 June 2014

Cats are hardly ordinary creatures, and Venus, a cat living in North Carolina, is even more extraordinary. The chimera cat is, as her Facebook fan page states, ‘0% Photoshopped, 100% Born This Way’.

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Meet Peanut, the 2014 winner of the world’s ugliest dog competition

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Eco on Thursday 26 June 2014

And we can see why. The 26th World’s Ugliest Dog contest held at the Sonoma-Marin Fairgrounds in Petaluma, California just wrapped up and 2-year-old rescue dog, Peanut, bagged the esteemed honor with his dashing grin, eye-popping peepers, and beautiful fur.

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Bamboo bikes to teach kids to balance, plus go green from a young age

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Eco on Wednesday 25 June 2014

Sure, we’ve seen bamboo bikes before way back when in 2011, but these ones by GreenChamp Bikes rock harder. Why? These beginners’ balance bikes for young kids aged 3-5 look so darn cute, they are definitely a great way to incorporate eco-consciousness in these little rascals, never mind the lack of pedals.

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In this Chinese village, villagers help electronic waste find a second life

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Eco on Wednesday 25 June 2014

In China, over 100 million computers, 40 million televisions, 20 million air conditioners and 10 million fridges are discarded annually. Most of Beijing’s electronic waste apparently make their way to Dongxiaokou, where local villagers resell e-waste parts and recycle these for a living. Photographer Kim Kyung-Hoon recently documented this lesser-seen side of China in pictures […]

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Stray cat meets wild cat, lives happily ever after

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Eco on Monday 23 June 2014

This actually happened: at the St. Petersburg Zoo in Russia, a stray cat who wandered into one of the enclosures for food became so enamored with the resident European lynx in it that it now stays there for good with its giant cat friend from the wild — with the blessings of the zoo. It’s […]

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Walmart and Tesco sell prawns linked to slavery on fishing boats

Kenny Ong Contributor

By Kenny Ong in New Eco on Friday 20 June 2014

An investigative Guardian report has revealed that Thai fishing boats where workers are enslaved, brutalized and even killed play a pivotal role in the global shrimp supply business. The Thailand-based Charoen Pokphand (CP) Foods buys fishmeal from these boats where slaves are forced to work for no pay and under threat of extreme violence.

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Fact: Great White Sharks do get eaten by Greater White Sharks

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Eco on Thursday 19 June 2014

When a perfectly healthy 9-ft Great White Shark in Australia tagged by scientists was found months later to have been eaten by an unknown predator, the data from its ‘black box’ pointed to how it had been devoured by an even bigger predator.

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These starfish just love to stand tall and tiptoe

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Eco on Tuesday 17 June 2014

Zoologist Christopher Mah, who keeps a fascinating blog about marine invertebrates dubbed The Echinoblog, once wrote about the unique behavior of starfish that has them standing tall on all fives to tiptoe as they spawn. It still remains a mystery as to why so many of them do it (some spawn flat) as no studies […]

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Baby rhino can’t sleep alone at night after witnessing poachers kill its mum

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Eco on Friday 13 June 2014

It’s heartbreaking to hear and read about majestic rhinos being slaughtered left and right by poachers who want their horns. It’s more heartbreaking to know a baby rhino orphan was found grieving next to its dead mother. ‘It was a devastating sight, as the tiny animal would not leave her side, and was crying inconsolably […]

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Female-named hurricanes are more deadly because people don’t fear them as much as male hurricanes, says study

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Eco on Saturday 7 June 2014

According to a recent study by the University of Illinois and Arizona State University, hurricanes with female names have a higher death rate compared to those with male names. Why is this so? Because sexism! Examining the death rates from 1950 to 2012, it turns out that of the 47 most deadly hurricanes, female-named hurricanes averaged around 45 deaths compared to 23 deaths in male-named ones.  ‘[Our] model suggests that changing a severe hurricane’s name from Charley … to Eloise … could nearly triple its death toll’, the study says.

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