New Art

High-brow art, low-brow art, somewhere in between brow-art. Hmmm. We wear our brows firmly on our face, thank-you. Oh, that’s a photorealistic line drawing of a cat riding a bicycle, you say. Right? No, well, it looks kinda cool so we’ll say it’s art anyway. And we’ll dig it more if it actually has some meaning.

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Japanese colour Woodcuts by Kitagawa Utamaro

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Art on Wednesday 12 February 2014

‘Ukiyo-e’, translated as ‘pictures of the floating world’, are prints and paintings that recorded everyday scenes during the Tokugawa Shogunate of the Edo period (1614-1868) in Japan. Usually, the subjects would range from celebrated courtesans of the Yoshiwara district, Kabuki theatre actors, sumo wrestlers, and average people doing their everyday activities. So it’s much like […]

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City life and vibrant colours drawn onto sheet music

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Art on Wednesday 12 February 2014

UK-based illustrator and designer Mike Lemanski has breathed life into otherwise ‘normal’ sheets of music by illustrating miniature people doing their daily routines amongst the notes and bars on the page.

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This dad coloured-in his kids’ art to kill time on business trips – we interviewed him

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Art on Tuesday 11 February 2014

Redditor Tatsputin, or Fred Giovannitti in real life,  wowed us all with his superior dad skills by simply colouring in his kids’ artworks to kill the time on his business trips. The Internet picked up the story and the rest, as they say, is history. We spoke to the Super Dad about how it all started and what he’s been doing since [read our original post about Tatsputin here and here's a Facebook Q&A our readers did with him]

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Tony Montana loves that white powdery stuff called flour

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Art on Tuesday 11 February 2014

Say hello to my little friend. And by ‘little’, I mean it literally. Scarface’s Tony Montana – or should I say Toy Montana – is one of the many toy characters Tumblr artist VSE OK uses to create tiny world scenarios. In this episode, we see Montana looking to get some of that addicting white […]

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Artist leaves graffiti in hard-to-find places in hotel rooms – we interviewed him about it

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Art on Monday 10 February 2014

David Bussell is a writer, performer, and stand-up comedian who has travelled to many places and stayed in plenty of hotels. In these hotels, he leaves what he calls hotel graffiti in places hard to find, such as behind picture frames, underneath toilet bowls, and so on. We interviewed him to pick his brain about his famous brand of street art. [read our original post about this hotel graffiti and a Facebook Q&A our readers recently did with him]

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Stones and bones used as canvas for highly detailed illustrations

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Art on Saturday 8 February 2014

When French painter and illustrator DZO said on his website that he doesn’t like constraint when it comes to art, we assumed he meant his choice of canvas. So probably after mastering traditional art on boring pieces of paper – which you can check out on his Instagram – he moved on to more challenging surfaces: stones and skulls. He uses river stones and a found skull and covered them with intricate illustrations. Kudos to his steady hand and patience, because from the look of these pieces, it must have took him a long time to finish each one.

UPDATE: We interviewed DZO about his peculiar choice of canvas and also asked about his intricate art style. Here’s a preview of our exclusive interview!

You use a paper, as well as stones and skulls, for your art. Which type of canvas do you like drawing on best and why?

My favourite canvas is paper! Any paper. But the skull was incredibly interesting due to surfaces variations.

What was the most challenging part of drawing on stones and bone? What was the best part about it?

Those surface are still ‘living’ materials: rough, bold, smooth, cracked, absorbent. Taming the variety of surfaces on a volume is a real adventure! That was the challenge for me.

Best part?  The part where I finish it and watch the impact of this kind of artwork.

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Night Light Detroit: an initiative to bring light to midtown Detroit

Contributions Reader Find

By Alex Steele in New Art on Friday 7 February 2014

Night Light Detroit is a delightfully bright and colorful addition to Detroit’s art scene. Designed by a university sculpture class under the guise of Larry and Friends Design Group, the goal of the project was to create a new source of illumination in midtown Detroit, where very few streetlights have left the area dim. Resembling […]

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Beautiful sand paintings that only last temporarily

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Art on Friday 7 February 2014

Artist Joe Mangrum has created over 650 public sand paintings on the streets of New York, Chicago, San Francisco, and other big cities since 2009. These bright and colourful sand paintings usually take him six to eight hours of back breaking work, only to have the temporary works disappear later on. Such is the dedication of a true artist.

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Giant animal and human sculptures made from coat hangers

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Art on Friday 7 February 2014

Who knew coat hangers could create ferocious and realistic animal sculptures? ‘Coathangers’ is a collection of sculptures by Scottish sculptor David Mach, in which he uses an unconventional component, wire coat hangers, as his main art material. The collection includes animal figures like a bear, a gorilla, a tiger, an elk (or is that a deer?), as well as human figures like an astronaut.

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Pristine white ski slope transformed into colourful snowy riot

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Art on Wednesday 5 February 2014

We’re a fan of Swiss artist Olaf Breunings, if you haven’t noticed by now. He recently caught our attention by pouring food dye down a ski slope in Gstaad, Switzerland. Now, we would have loved to do that too.

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These screamingly cool black-ink tattoos exemplify graphic art at its best

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Art on Wednesday 5 February 2014

Polish tatt artist Kamil Czapiga from Katowice makes use of the neo-Impressionist pointillism technique of using tiny dots of pure colors to craft stark, crisp tattoos that blend tribal mythology and timeless geometry most holistically. Wow.

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Romain Laurent’s animated portraits will make you smile

Rachel Oakley Contributor

By Rachel Oakley in New Art on Wednesday 5 February 2014

Romain Laurent sure knows how to grab our attention. This fun artist has challenged himself to created a looped animated portrait each week since last September, and by the looks of things, he’s doing himself proud.

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Terracotta Army dressed in colourful lanterns for Chinese New Year

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Art on Wednesday 5 February 2014

Chinese artist Xia Nan put a holiday twist to the famous Terracotta Army by donning them with colourful and brightly-lit lanterns. Installed at the Edinburgh University Old College Quadrangle, the 2.5 meter tall sculptures usher in the Chinese New Year with their red, green, blue, and white, hues.

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Eyepopping street art by Escif

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Art on Tuesday 4 February 2014

True, we’ve featured Escif before, but clearly the Spanish street artist has created even more unbeatable murals since. Just look at that giant light switch he did in southwestern Poland and the one of the giant door lock in Montreal, Canada.

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Gummy Glass: a stained glass peacock made from a variety of sweets

Inigo del Castillo Contributor

By Inigo del Castillo in New Art on Tuesday 4 February 2014

Talk about playing with your food! Massachusetts-based artist Judith Klausner loves food so much, she’s dedicate years of work creating beautiful art with them. In fact, we’ve featured her work before in a series called, ‘From Scratch’, in which she carves classical portraits out of Oreo creams.

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