New Art

High-brow art, low-brow art, somewhere in between brow-art. Hmmm. We wear our brows firmly on our face, thank-you. Oh, that’s a photorealistic line drawing of a cat riding a bicycle, you say. Right? No, well, it looks kinda cool so we’ll say it’s art anyway. And we’ll dig it more if it actually has some meaning.

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Walls of Freedom: Street Art of the Egyptian Revolution

Callum Gibson Reader Find

By Callum Gibson in New Art on Monday 4 November 2013

Ever wondered how the past few years of trouble have effected art in Egypt? Well, Walls of Freedom is a collaborative project of about 50 artists who have come together to produce a book about the revolution in the form of its artwork. Some of the pieces are political, while others pay tribute to the martyrs who have given their lives for the cause.

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Finnish artist makes his work speaks for itself

Abby Yemm Contributor

By Abby Yemm in New Art on Friday 1 November 2013

Borrowing from the knowledge, artistry and the humour of others (Gertrude Stein, Mitch Hedberg, Franz Kafka), Finnish artist Mikko Kuorinki makes a variety of modern work that speaks for itself. Kurorinki uses performance, installation, video and photography to explore the intricacies between the individual and physical realm.

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David Černý gives the Czech President the finger in 30-foot sculpture

Rachel Oakley Contributor

By Rachel Oakley in New Art on Thursday 31 October 2013

What can only be described as “ballsy,” Czech artist David Černý has outdone himself again by erecting a giant purple ‘f**k you’ right in the middle of Prague’s Vltava River, across from the Prague Castle where Czech president Milos Zeman lives. The 45-year-old sculptor has made a name for himself throughout the globe for his politically motivated pieces (eg: vandalizing a tank statue at the Soviet war memorial by painting it pink!), and this time Černý’s point is just as clear.

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Surreal floating eye sculptures

Annie Churdar Contributor

By Annie Churdar in New Art on Wednesday 30 October 2013

Sophie Ryder created these large wire sculptures with a direct reference to charcoal sketching. The UK artist installed the surreal sculptures to hang and interact with the air space above a field. It’s as if a page were torn from an drawing students sketch book and made to look down on us all.

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Banksy rejected by New York Times, fights back with scathing street art piece

Annie Churdar Contributor

By Annie Churdar in New Art on Wednesday 30 October 2013

Banksy’s latest installation smells of resentment. He wrote an article for the New York Times about the new ‘One World Trade Center’ project being ugly. Actually, he called it “vanilla” and “something from Canada”. The article was supposed to be another installment in his daily ‘Better Out Than In’ graffiti series. But predictably, his article was rejected. And like a sulking kid, he went ahead and made a big stink about it with this mural instead. Go Banksy. His work never ceases to make me smile.

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New Zealand man 3D printing 1961 Aston Martin replica

Annie Churdar Contributor

By Annie Churdar in New Art on Wednesday 30 October 2013

One man in New Zealand is taking 3D printing to the next level. Ivan Sentch is printing a full sized, 1961 Aston Martin DB4 replica with his Solidoodle 3D printer. According to the Aukland man’s blog, he started the project back around last Christmas and plans to create a fiber-glass mold of the print when he finally finishes.

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Street art with a decaying twist: photos by Charlene Weisler

Lost At E Minor Reader Find

By Lost At E Minor in New Art on Tuesday 29 October 2013

Charlene Weisler’s urban photography is inspired by the transience and impermanence of street art. Concentrating on the evolving nature of layered, decaying graffiti, Weisler’s art captures a timeline of competing efforts and messages eroded by weather and time. Notably, the photographs are “as-is” – as she finds them on the streets – and are not […]

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Xi’an Terracotta Soldiers Meet Prune Nourry’s Terracotta Daughters

Rachel Oakley Contributor

By Rachel Oakley in New Art on Tuesday 29 October 2013

The terracotta soldiers of Xi’an are nothing short of amazing. And French artist Prune Nourry uses this significant archeological excavation in her installation of Terracotta Daughters—116 life size sculptures of, you got it, girls. The collection has been exhibited at Magda Danysz Gallery in Shanghai and touches on a sociological phenomenon: the preference Chinese parents […]

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da Vinci’s Renaissance man, updated for the 21st century

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Art on Tuesday 29 October 2013

Art gets reinvented all the time. That stuff never gets old. We are just chuckling at these modern-age interpretations of Leonardo da Vinci’s famous Vitruvian Man or depiction of the perfect Renaissance man. Grilling, as you can see, is a very important skill for the Renaissance man of today.

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Deep fried fine art prints

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Art, New Design on Tuesday 29 October 2013

Something must be said of these savory — or should we say unsavory, because they aren’t actually edible — art prints by Iron Frog Press that have been ‘100% deep fried with a secret recipe’. They even come in checkered paper baskets for that takeout experience. Wonder if they’re cooked in monounsaturated oils.

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Witty signs by David Shrigley

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Art on Tuesday 29 October 2013

A neon burger sign in backwards that reads ‘BACKWARD BURGERS’. Another one that simply reads ‘RATS’. These witty signs by David Shrigley — who we usually associate with irreverent comic doodles and captions — are simply perfect.

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Comfort: a new collage art series by Sarah Eisenlohr

Sarah Eisenlohr Reader Find

By Sarah Eisenlohr in New Art on Tuesday 29 October 2013

From what was originally intended just as a class project thrown together overnight were the pieces that formed into my first collage series, Mapping. A year later, I still continued to use the same technique of cut-up magazines, paste and nocturnal inspiration to create work for my BFA senior thesis exhibition at the University of Montana.

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New paintings by Radiohead collaborator Stanley Donwood

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Art on Tuesday 29 October 2013

‘Give me a few more years and I’ll be painting fluffy puppies or something,’ so observed longtime Radiohead collaborator Stanley Donwood of just how sentimental his recent exhibition in London is: there, he showcased twenty-something new-ish drawings, such as a ‘pen and ink drawing that was so painstaking and took so fucking long that the […]

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Food graffiti of brand logos made with their products

Low Lai Chow Contributor

By Low Lai Chow in New Art on Tuesday 29 October 2013

Haha, this is hilarious. Leave no mess, consume what you produce. Food graffiti street artist Dorota Pankowska armed herself with substances like Nutella, Cheez Whiz and Miracle Whip, and used these to stencil the iconic brand logos of these very condiments. It started when she started thinking about expressing her love for Nutella ‘by putting the logo around the city, at which point I asked myself, Why not actually make it out of the stuff?’. Way cool.

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Wet plate photos by visual artist Kristen Hatgi

Abby Yemm Contributor

By Abby Yemm in New Art, New Photography on Monday 28 October 2013

Kristen Hatgi is a Denver-based visual artist with a knack for creating spooky and sensual photos, using a wet plate (collodion) process in her backyard. Hatgi and her husband Mark Sink use this nineteenth century process (though incredibly inconvenient, tedious and unpredictable) to show work with microscopic detail and a haunting modern-meets-ancestral feel.

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