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Champagne Charlie (1944): an epic cockney-fest

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By Stairs To Korea in New Film on Friday 2 September 2011

The single most amazingly Wap Wap Wah Victorian cockney-fest in cinematic history. This film is brilliant for the following reasons: Tommy Trinder is initially hired to sing in a South London pub for a salary of ‘Two halfs of half and half and a pork pie'; When he goes AWOL for days, drinking around Piccadilly, […]

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The London Nobody Knows

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By Stairs To Korea in New Film on Saturday 16 July 2011

In 1967, James Mason presented this film based on the writings of Geoffrey Fletcher. It’s a fascinating nose into some of the less familiar corners of London, with some great footage from the city of the 60s. The tap dancer you see in the film only died quite recently at the age of 97. I found this out from being an inveterate archive nerd.

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Craig Nunn

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By Stairs To Korea in New Photography on Saturday 16 July 2011

Craig Nunn takes wonderful pictures of all sorts of things. He took photos of me once. He somehow finds time to play in London lo-fi stalwarts Internet Forever, and be a primary school teacher. He calls himself Heartbeeps and he’s got a book out of his photos of India.

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Hollis Frampton (and the Screening Room series)

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By Stairs To Korea in Video on Saturday 16 July 2011

One of the many avant-garde filmmakers profiled on Screening Room (countless episodes of which are on Youtube), Hollis Frampton made some beautiful films, knocked about with Ezra Pound, and wrote about things like Pi and Mount Fujiama.

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The Fake Houses of Leinster Gardens

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By Stairs To Korea in Cool Travel on Friday 15 July 2011

On the rare occasions that I make it to London’s glitzy West London area, I like to show people these Fake Houses. Back in the days of underground steam engines, some parts of the track needed to be exposed for engines to let off steam. The residents of this fancy neighbourhood objected to a big pit nasty-ing up the terrace, so they built two fake houses. They’re only five feet thick, all the windows are blacked out, and there are no letterboxes in the concrete doors.

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