Hao Ni Reader

Hao Ni

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Robert Mckirdie: making art from recycled waste

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By Hao Ni in New Art on Friday 25 January 2013

Robert Mckirdie’s work explores technology and the change that occurs as that new technology moves from the physical to more ephemeral roles in peoples’ daily lives. He synthesizes these ideas by mining the waste of society as it plows forward searching for fossils of past technology. In his work, everything is exposed, and all is seen.

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Mimicry and fantasy: the artwork of Hao Ni

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By Hao Ni in New Art on Tuesday 22 January 2013

Through blurry childhood memories of the past, and the wishful imagination for the distant future, I draw my inspiration from events both seemingly insignificant and profound to create my art. I wish to evole a sense of mimicry gone fantasy since imitation can provide an understanding not only of the structures and systems that surround us in everyday life, but also an opportunity for the exploration of the possibilities of restructuring the systems to construct new identities and functionalities.

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Colourful urban art by Chicago’s Chris Silva

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By Hao Ni in New Art on Monday 14 January 2013

Being a street artist himself in Chicago, Chris Silva loves to collaborate with people using found objects and colorful murals to create amazing art that reflects its urban setting. Of his work, he says: ‘I am interested in the visually poetic, employ ambiguity in my work and strive to express the essence rather than the details. I see opportunities in accidents, enjoy unusual combinations of materials, the unpredictable outcomes of collaboration and the general adventure of the creative process’.

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Matthew J Mahoney examines the idea of the American hero

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By Hao Ni in New Art on Monday 14 January 2013

Artist Matthew J Mahoney has been living and working in San Diego ad his work deals primarily with ideas of the American hero: maleness, religious iconography, and boyhood ritual. In his exploration of these themes, the deconstruction of archetypes has been evidently as important as their celebration.

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