Photography

Ta-ku tells Lost At E Minor his four must-read photography (and life) tips

Ta-ku (Reggie Mathews) is one of Australia’s most fascinating creatives.

He carved a name out for himself as a producer around the turn of the decade – his impossibly vibey hip-hop rhythms becoming a trademark.

Reggie made waves with his 2013 debut EP ‘Songs To Break Up To’, before stamping his name on Australia’s electronic scene with his aptly-named sophomore effort, ‘Songs to Make Up To’.

But at the peak of his musical powers, Ta-ku made the surprising and unquestionably brave decision to switch to photography.

This career change was made all the more remarkable by the fact that he lives with colour blindness.

His debut exhibition, ‘CLRBLND’, was a fascinating exploration of his condition, and he’s following it up with ‘823’ at Melbourne’s Lindberg Gallery (December 7-10).

This latest project, powered by Dropbox, will include hosted photo walks with Ta-ku’s Create & Explore collective, panel discussions with Beats 1 Radio host Joe Kay and an intimate studio session with Melbourne producer Thrupence and the man himself.

Ta-ku in conversation

Ahead of the show, we asked Ta-Ku to share some of his best photography tips so you can follow in his footsteps:

Start with what you have

If you are looking to get into photography just use the tools you already have. No need to buy something new & expensive just yet.

Perhaps use your phone camera? Or an old hand me down camera from your folks?

Find your style and get comfortable. I started on my iPhone for about six months & it helped me find my stride.

Take your camera everywhere.

Never go a day without taking your camera with you everywhere you go. I mean everywhere. I never leave the house without a camera.

Those moments can come at any time. Sometimes you need to find moments yourself.

This advice really works with any medium though – how can you progress if you’re not doing it every day?

Don’t compare yourself to others.

Another blanket statement from Uncle Ta-ku here (haha).

However, I find constantly comparing yourself to another artist is really detrimental to your general wellbeing & creative psyche.

We all have separate journeys and progress at different speeds. So just make sure you are experimenting and pushing yourself to be better every day.

Tell your story.

No matter what style you develop. Try to tell a story that’s unique to you and that you connect with. This will organically lead to satisfying work & an audience that appreciate you and the work that is true to you.

‘823’ is open to the public at Lindberg Gallery from 10am – 5pm from Friday 8 December – Sunday 11 December.