Tech

Found At E Minor: This high tech capsule will protect you against hurricanes and earthquakes

An Aeronautical engineer has developed a personalized safety system that isolates you from the devastation of the fiercest of natural disasters.

These survival spheres are made from aircraft-grade aluminum, have watertight marine doors and tiny portholes that make them look like contraptions out of Jules Verne’s imagination.

Julian Sharpe is an Aeronautical Engineer from Loughborough University of Technology in England. Back in 2004, Sharpe began playing around with the idea of building a survival pod motivated by the horrific images of the Tsunami in Indonesia. The entrepreneur and his family were staying at a waterfront hotel in Cannon Beach, Oregon, when he started wondering how could they get to safety if a similar disaster struck their location.

“Our kids were very little. We had two huskies. How could we evacuate in time?” He said to the Seattle TImes.

On the back of his expertise from previous work at Boeing, the European Space Agency and Agusta Helicopters, he developed his project and send it in 2011 to the NASA Tech Brief Innovation Contest, managing to make 9th out of about 350 entries.

The capsule is designed to be mounted inside or outside your home or workplace and comes in various sizes that can host from two to ten people. According to the manufacturer, each capsule can store 5 days of food supplies per person, they’re equipped with GPS, water storage tanks, air supply tanks and basic internal illumination.

Sharpe’s day job is to run a small company that specializes in structural analysis and stress testing of airplane components. This provided him with the ideal know-how to design pods strong enough to withstand the damage of almost any natural catastrophe. One of the most extreme tests they did was dropping a capsule over the 200-foot-tall Palouse Falls. Surprisingly it didn’t suffer any serious damage.

The pods, which come in very bright colors to improve chances of being spotted from the sky, cost around $14k for the two person model and some 20k for one capable of hosting four people.

>>Also watch: There’s a trail in Denmark where you can find giant trolls hiding in the woods

About the author

Filmmaker. 3D artist. Procrastination guru. I spend most of my time doing VFX work for my upcoming film Servicios Públicos, a sci-fi dystopia about robots, overpopulated cities and tyrant states. @iampineros

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