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Legoland Japan is now open and it’s the stuff dreams are made of

Legoland Japan, the country’s first outdoor LEGO theme park opened the 1st of April in Nagoya, with more than 500 people lining up at 7:30 AM against the cold, rainy weather.

The theme park, which caters to kids ages 2 to 12, features 17 million LEGO bricks and about 10,000 toy models. It will also offer interactive attractions and over 40 rides and shows. There are also plans to build a 10 billion yen hotel in 2018 as part of a project to create a resort area.

If there’s a paradise I think this is it.

When word first got out about the project, the news was met with mixed feelings and many certainly raised their eyebrows at the exorbitant fares.

Legoland Japan occupies around nine hectares – a relatively small space compared to other amusements parks – yet ticket prices range from 6,900 Yen (AUS$84 or US$63) for a one-day pass up to 13,300 Yen (AUS$161or US$121) for the annual pass.

Despite this, visitors still came in droves during the park’s opening week.

Legoland Japan is divided into seven different zones, like the worlds featured in The Lego Movie. These include Bricktopia, Knights Kingdom, Pirate Shores, and Miniland.

The company said that more than 10 million bricks were used to recreate some of Japan’s most renowned landmarks like Nagoya Castle and Tokyo Tower.

All this reminds me of that scene in Pulp Fiction in which John Travolta and Uma Thurman talk about that expensive milkshake at the ‘Jack Rabbit Slims’ dinner. I don’t know if Legoland Japan is really worth 60 bucks a day, but it sure looks pretty f*cking amazing.

About the author

Filmmaker. 3D artist. Procrastination guru. I spend most of my time doing VFX work for my upcoming film Servicios Públicos, a sci-fi dystopia about robots, overpopulated cities and tyrant states. @iampineros

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