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The first underwater museum has opened in Europe and it’s amazing

Located near the South coast of Lanzarote in Spain, Museo Atlantico is the first sub-aquatic museum in Europe. Built at 12mt underwater this is an exhibition you can only experience if you know how to scuba dive.

The project was built with the intent of merging environmental conservation awareness with tourism and art. In its 2,500 square meter exhibition area you can find over 300 mesmerising sculptures by renowned British artist Jason deCaires Taylor.

A statue couple taking a selfie

Taylor is no stranger to the spotlight. He became known back in 2006 with the creation of the world’s first underwater sculpture park, installed off the west coast of Grenada and listed by National Geographic as one of the Top 25 Wonders of the World.

He also co-founded MUSA (Museo Subacuático de Arte), located between Cancun and Isla Mujeres in Mexico and recently finished what can be the biggest underwater sculpture ever made, a mammoth 60 ton, 18-foot work titled ‘Ocean Atlas’ located in the Bahamas.

Statues holding hands

Taylor is recognised for creating eerie scenes that evoke both romantic and apocalyptic feelings. His sculptures are made from non toxic, neutral PH grade cement that attracts marine biomass to facilitate the reproduction of various species. In time, these sculptures will become a living, breathing part of the environment.

Statues of refugees on a boat

Museo Atlantico is certainly not the first of its kind. Other spectacular and similar endeavors like MUSA in Mexico and Herod’s Harbor in Israel have made headlines in the past. But this one stands out because of its scale and incredibly-detailed art works.

Museo Atlantico just opened this January, and is available to the public on weekdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. A dive costs €12 (AUS$17 or US$12.80) and they provide you with all the gear and guidance needed.

Statues of refugees

“I hope that the Museo Atlántico of Lanzarote represents an entry point to a different world and promotes a better understanding of our precious marine environment and of how much we depend on it,” said Pedro San Ginés, president of the local government of Lanzarote.

A boy in a boat

About the author

Filmmaker. 3D artist. Procrastination guru. I spend most of my time doing VFX work for my upcoming film Servicios Públicos, a sci-fi dystopia about robots, overpopulated cities and tyrant states. @iampineros

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