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Netizens in China and Taiwan declare ‘apology’ war on each other

The Chinese and the Taiwanese netizens have declared an internet war! Well, sort of. Because they are actually apologising to each other (mockingly, of course).

Many have joined this ‘apology war’ by posting satirical posts on social media. These “I’m sorry, but I hate you” posts have fed long-standing tensions between the two nations.

Interestingly, the ‘war’ started with a Japanese actress called Kiko Mizuhara.

About two months ago, several controversial photographs surfaced on the actress’ Instagram account. One showing someone pointing the middle finger at Tiananmen. Chinese netizens then began to call for a boycott of her films. As a result, the Japanese artist had to issue an official apology video to save her career in China.

In the video, she bows and clarifies that she is a supporter of world peace. “I definitely will not offend or intended to offend anyone in China,” said Mizuhara, who ended the video by apologising in Mandarin.

‘Deeply moved’ by the actress’ message, Taiwanese Facebook user, Wang-Yikai created a page called First Annual Apologize to China Contest. It urges people to ‘apologise’ to China. And, the one who posted the most creative ‘apology’ will be dubbed as the winner.

“Sorry China, we have a good conscience,” said one commenter. Another posted a picture of her kids with the caption “Sorry China, I have three kids!” to mock the country’s one-child policy.

Others hit at the country’s strict media control : “We have not been brainwashed by the communist party, Sorry China!” and “Oops, I can use the number 6 and 4 on my keyboard, Sorry China.”

Meanwhile, Chinese internet users joined the fray via Weibo. They too expressed how ‘apologetic’ they felt towards Taiwan with the #FirstAnnualApologizetoTaiwanContest.

“Sorry Taiwan, you can’t be Japanese because we support One-China,” said one Weibo user, while another said: “Sorry Taiwan, you’re a district, not a country!”

The winner of the contest will be announced later this month. In fact, the most creative post will even receive a prize from the organisers! Sweet.

Here’s another artist (Kpop star: Tzuyu) who was forced to apologise to China:

Via HKFP

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