Travel

This is how Tokyo looks from one of the tallest structures in the world

Rising 634 meters into the sky, the Tokyo Skytree is the tallest tower in the world, and the second biggest man-made structure today (the first being the Burj Khalifa in Dubai).

Apart from being a TV broadcaster tower, it also has observation decks that offer the most spectacular views of the city’s epic skyline.

Built in just four years (in comparison, the World Trade Center took seven years) at a cost of $806 million, it’s representative of the neo-futurist movement.

In anticipation of its opening in May 2012, people reportedly waited in line for a week to get tickets, with visits were fully booked for its first two months of operation.

The elevators are Japan’s fastest, covering 29 stories in about 50 seconds – that’s about 36 kilometers per hour. Pretty damn impressive considering Usain Bolt clocks 43 km/h.

Tickets are sold at 2060 yen ($AU26). For an extra yen, you can take a separate elevator up to the ‘450th’ floor, the highest area available to the public. That’s almost 100 metres above the rest, at about 450 meters from the ground.

Being at this height is simply spellbinding, and on a clear day you can see all the way to Mt Fuji!

It’s a bit more expensive, but if you want to avoid the lines you can reserve tickets at their website.

The Tokyo Skytree is open from 8am to 10pm every day of the week.

About the author

Filmmaker. 3D artist. Procrastination guru. I spend most of my time doing VFX work for my upcoming film Servicios Públicos, a sci-fi dystopia about robots, overpopulated cities and tyrant states. @iampineros

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