by Marta Millere in New Eco, New Trends on Thursday 17 April 2014

People do the craziest things in the name of science, love or their country. Back in the 1980s, Justin Schmidt, decided to take it up a notch and measure pain. He must have woken up one morning and decided that it was up to him to endure 25 bee stings to understand which part of a human body is the most sensitive to pain.

He put together what is now called the Schmidt pain index, which measured the painfulness of stings from 78 species of insects on a scale of 0 to 4. As you can imagine, the only stings that he chose to rate at ’4′ belonged to crazy-ass insects such as the bullet ant and the tarantula hawk.

Obviously, pain is subjective and the way I feel when a bee stings me, could be nothing compared to what Suzy or Bobby feels. The martyr for science that he was, Schmidt decided to rate all of the stings on himself. In that tradition, the author of this study hypothesized that the pain level of a sting also depends on its location on the body. He tested this hypothesis by getting stung. A lot. As it turns out, the most painful location for being stung by a bee is on the nostril, followed by the lip and the penis. Yup, the penis. On the other hand, the less sensitive places are the skull, the tip of the middle toe and the upper arm.

Let’s just say we trust him. Promise us that you won’t try this at home.

Via Discovery Magazine blog