by Marta Millere in New Products on Tuesday 1 April 2014

Coffee is one of those magical drinks whose aroma, smell and taste brings back memories, creates emotions and stimulates creativity. Which is why the NESCAFÉ Team, rather ingeniously, saw a gap in the market between high-end espresso capsules and regular instant coffee, and launched NESCAFÉ AZERA – a high-end coffee that combines premium instant coffee with finely ground roasted coffee beans. And the best part is that it’s so easy to use, it doesn’t need a coffee plunger (or French press to some).

So what are we going to do with all these unwanted plungers, I hear you ask? Well, we invited three Australian designers to find a new use for them – Christel Hadiwibawa, founder of ChristelH, a creative studio that specializes in the design and creation of furniture, lighting, and conceptual design projects; Jacob Pemble, owner and head designer at Juxtaposed Design; and Seaton McKeon, who freelances for a broad range of clients but specializes in in-house industrial design.

As part of this project, they will each be tasked with transforming 50 old plungers into something else entirely in the short time frame of just two weeks, using the most innovative processes and craftsmanship that they can think of.

‘This project is an opportunity to show people that they can have an original design and use the components of something that they thought was rubbish. Being able to do this with an awesome international brand makes the entire concept even more amazing’, said Jacob, one of the designers.

Seaton, who is a big double espresso drinker, thinks that working on something together and ‘lending a hand to your mate on a weekend to build a deck or something is part of that social aspect of creating a micro-community around yourself’.

Christel loves thinking innovatively and was very excited to get on board with the project. ‘It’s not an ‘au revoir’ to quality coffee, but rather an ‘au revoir’ to old ways of doing things that may not be as efficient due to the times that are changing. The fast paced world we live in has simply opened another avenue to how people can drink coffee’, she said.

Below are examples of Jacob, Seaton, and Christel’s previous projects which display the ingenuity that they will be bringing to this project.

We spoke to all 3 designers in depth about the AZERA competition:

JACOB PEMBLE

jacob-2

What inspired you to take part in this project?
‘The entire concept of this project is something that really interests me. The idea of up-cycling is something that fascinates me and has become a design principal that I am very passionate about. I feel that a lot of the ideas about sustainability are misguided and the general public is missing out on some awesome potential opportunities.

‘This project is an opportunity to show people that they can have an original design and use the components of something that they thought was either rubbish or a space filler in a cupboard. Being able to do this with an awesome international brand makes the entire concept even more amazing’.

jacob-1

Are you a coffee drinker and if so what’s your tip for making a good coffee?
‘I love a good coffee and can’t imagine a morning without it. Or the several others which follow it during the course of my day. There were many nights at university and working on projects since which have been fuelled by coffee.

‘Unfortunately my skills as a barista are almost non-existent. So as long as the coffee itself is top drawer and capped off with a touch of milk and a sugar, it’s happy days for me’.

jacob-3

‘Coffee has evolved, say ‘au revoir’ to your plunger’: what does this mean to you?
‘Like everything around us, coffee as a product and a service is changing. People are increasingly time poor, and for me, this an opportunity for them to have a nice cuppa without having to leave home or the office.

‘It’s not about saying goodbye to your plunger forever, but it’s about looking at the experience in a different light. When you consider that working people like tradesman now order things like skim lattes from the coffee shop next to a building site, you see how far things have come. And this is just the next step in the evolution. Be adventurous and try something new’.

Why do you think Australians love DYI so much? Where do you think this trend started?
‘Australians are just people who love to go out and “do”. I think it’s something culturally that runs through so many of us. You can see this in the success of television shows about renovation. I know that as a child, I was raised spending time in the shed building things, fixing things and just tinkering on things around the house with my father and both my grandfathers.

‘It’s just the done thing and it’s something I love doing. When I moved into the unit I currently live in one of the things I most hated was the vast majority of renovating and design that was done pretty quickly and I don’t really have anything around the place to tinker with.

SEATON MCKEON

seaton-2

What inspired you to take part in this project?
‘It was a novel brief which sounded fun’.

Are you a coffee drinker and if so what’s your tip for making a good coffee?
‘Big time coffee drinker. In general, double shots and less milk’.

seaton-3

seaton-1

Why do you think Australians love DIY so much? Where do you think this trend started?
‘Prior to the contemporary consumer model of everyday life, doing-it-yourself was the only option a lot of people had – whether it meant pouring a slab of concrete, building a shed, constructing a pergola, or fixing a motorbike. I think there is a great deal of satisfaction derived from making a direct impact or working on something that is useful within your own life.

‘I think there is also a great social aspect for people to lend a hand on the weekend to help build a mate’s deck or put a fence in. These kinds of projects are really about micro-communities, so I think it’s these aspects that people really love and find fulfilling’.

CHRISTEL HADIWIBAWA

Christel-4

What inspired you to take part in this project?
‘We don’t come across a project like this very often. This project was also very left field and unusual to other briefs that we would normally do, and we’re always open to trying new things’.

Are you a coffee drinker and if so what’s your tip for making a good coffee?

‘The only coffee I drink is ice coffee and even then I don’t drink that very often. I am more of a tea drinker and quite recently have fallen for Matcha (green tea latte). Yes, it’s the Asian side of me coming out’.

Christel-3

‘Coffee has evolved, say ‘au revoir’ to your plunger’: what does this mean to you?
‘The fast paced world we live in has simply opened another avenue to how people can drink coffee. It’s not an ‘au revoir’ to quality coffee, but rather an ‘au revoir’ to old ways of doing things that may not be as efficient due to the times that are changing.

‘I see the plunger being like the first Nokia phone: it will still do the job, but in comparison to your latest smart phone, ‘coffee has evolved’ means that there is now a quicker, faster, and more efficient way of getting coffee.

‘But the choice comes back to the individual. Some people will always love the old Nokia, and some people will love the smart phone’.

CHRISTEL

Why do you think Australians love DIY so much? Where do you think this trend started?
‘I think it’s a combination of two things: the fact that our country is so diverse and multicultural, and also that opportunity lies everywhere. This diversity keeps our minds open, and opportunity gives us freedom to try different things.

So we explore, we travel, we experience, we do things for ourselves and we discover; because the process of discovery is just as exciting as seeing whatever we do in its finished form, whether it’s a piece of furniture, a cooking recipe, or a house renovation.

‘I don’t think it’s so much of a trend as it is a lifestyle, a way of living. We’re just not afraid to give things a go, because even though I hardly use this term, at the end of the day, she’ll be right!’

Befitting a project of this proportion, there will be an event to unveil the designs and determine the winning design, on Tuesday, April 15 in The Rocks, Sydney, from 6-8pm. If you’d like to attend, email: nescafe@digitaslbi.com