by Inigo del Castillo in New Illustration on Saturday 15 February 2014

Rachael Wise isn’t your typical gal who’s easily impressed by princesses waiting for prince charming and cheesy fairy tale endings. Instead, she wants strong heroine figures and a more realistic portrayal of their tales. So she came up with a series with a dark and twisted sense of humor. We interviewed her about how the fucked-up fairy tales series came about and what’s next for her. Fingers crossed that Pixar tales are next! [read our original post about these illustrations]

What made you decide you wanted to do a set of fairytale illustrations with a dark, modern day twist?
I think it has to do with my sense of humour. I have a slightly twisted, kind of dark sense of humour. I think more than that, though, I also tended to get annoyed at stories that end too neatly, with heroines that always seem to need help.

This whole thing actually started with the drawing of the little mermaid. I kept thinking to myself, why is she waiting around, wishing to be different? Just do it yourself. That got me thinking about what would happen to the other fairy tale heroes and heroines. I kind of wanted to rewrite their stories, and untie some of the lose ends.

Your illustrations seem to be widely influenced by fashion. Tell us more about how fashion fits into your art and career.
I think the fashion influence is more an influence of pop culture in general, of which fashion is a huge huge part. Fashion influences every aspect of music, television and art. I think what I like best about incorporating fashion into my work is that it constantly changes, I never want my work to get stale.

One of your hobbies is watching overly-dramatic crime shows. Have these type of shows influenced the themes in your projects?
I think they do in a sense. I love those shows and I often watch them while I am doing my work, but I often do get annoyed that they tie up so neatly. Shows like Law and order or CSI all finish with in the hour and rarely do they end messily. Life never does that. So I think in a round about way they feed my frustration with neat endings, such as in fairytales.

What projects are you planning on illustrating next? Any chance you might do a Pixar-inspired fucked up tales?
I could do Pixar-inspired tales, that might be a lot of fun. Messing with the ending of cars, toy story and up sound especially amusing! As far as what I am doing now, I’ve been thinking about doing illustrations of real historical events, except I would change one thing, such as adding cell phones to the revolutionary war or televising the war of 1812