by Inigo del Castillo in Architecture on Thursday 30 January 2014

Here’s a high school campus that would make any kid want to go to school every day. The Island School in Hong Kong isn’t like your typical high school building. There are no boring walls, no low ceilings, and no prison-like bars for windows. Instead, the 28,000 square meter facility uses flexible classroom spaces and green architecture to promote learning.

Designed by Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects, in partnership with Thomas Chow Architects, the building merges with the beautiful landscape that surrounds it. Just imagine you’re bored in Algebra class, you look out the window, and out there is the amazing Hong Kong skyline. It’s so inspiring, I have a sudden thirst for education!

An atrium is the centrepiece of the building, setting the tone of the school and serving as a social venue. ‘The atrium is the heart of the school’, says Bjarne Hammer, founding partner at Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects, tells ArchDaily. ‘With its balconies, hanging greenery and gardens, it functions as an informal social gathering space where the students can meet and interact. The greenery creates a relaxing atmosphere and contributes positively to the learning environment’.

The school is set to replace their existing 1967 facility and will be open to approximately 1,200 students (ages 11-18). So when’s enrolment?

Via Arch Daily