Featured Image for 100 iconic landmarks reduced to their negative space
Photography

100 iconic landmarks reduced to their negative space

Architect Jose Davila’s new book There But Not reduces 100 iconic landmarks to their negative space. Since 2008 this Mexican architect has had a passion for photographing famous buildings, but he goes one step further with his art and cuts out the landmarks to leave ‘ghostly white silhouettes’ behind.

‘What’s around a building is part of the building itself and vice versa’, says Davila. From the Burj al Arab in Dubai and St. Basil’s Cathedral in Moscow, to the Ananda Temple in Myanmar and the Chrysler Building in NYC, it’s amazing how these architectural icons provide a unique appreciation for the architectural form.

Via Fast Code Design

The Chrysler Building, designed by William Van Alan and completed in 1930.
The Chrysler Building, designed by William Van Alan and completed in 1930.
This one's the Chateau de Chambord in Loir-et-Cher, France designed by Renaissance architect Domenico de Cortona in 1566.
This one’s the Chateau de Chambord in Loir-et-Cher, France designed by Renaissance architect Domenico de Cortona in 1566.
These doctored images highlight “the importance of context in architecture,” says Davila. Here, the Burj al Arab, by architect Tom Wills Wright, a luxury hotel in Dubai.
These doctored images highlight “the importance of context in architecture,” says Davila. Here, the Burj al Arab, by architect Tom Wills Wright, a luxury hotel in Dubai.
Mexican architect Jose Davila has made a practice of photographing iconic buildings, only to cut their silhouettes out of the photographs, leaving ghostly negative space.
Mexican architect Jose Davila has made a practice of photographing iconic buildings, only to cut their silhouettes out of the photographs, leaving ghostly negative space.

About the author

Rachel Oakley is an Aussie writer based in NYC with an obsession for the creepy, cool and quirky side of life. Some of her main passions include philosophy, art, travel, and sarcasm.

Videos from Lost At E Minor TV