by Low Lai Chow in New Art on Monday 14 October 2013

Livia Marin, who appropriates mass-market objects to reflect on how people relate to them, has a Nomadic Patterns series showing ceramics having some sort of meltdown. The effect is surreal and makes us want to eat ice-cream.

UPDATE: Guess what? We interviewed Livia Marin! Here’s a look at what’s in store in our exclusive interview.

What gave you the idea to create melted ceramic pieces?

My starting point was never to create melted ceramic pieces, rather, I began with an idea of ‘broken things’: how do we relate to everyday objects in an event of loss. To me, this relates to a relation of tension between care and discarding that is very present in our daily lives, and to what extent the meaning ascribed to objects is given from a very singular and personal point of view.

I arrived at ceramic objects since the very material nature of such objects hinges between an imminent fragility (they break) whilst at the same time they can last for centuries. I sought to make an object that could reside in an ambiguous area: broken yet complete, collapsing or just restored, and so on. Integrating the place and displacement of decorative patterns that are characteristic of ceramic objects, I finally made the object I was looking for. Since the objects looked as if the ceramic had melted, it seemed as if another contradiction was present in the work, though we know that ceramic do not melt, very much on the contrary, they reach their material stability by being exposed to very high temperatures within a kiln. However, it has been the viewers that have coined the term ‘melted ceramic’, which indeed is something I welcome.