by Zolton in New Trends on Wednesday 6 February 2013

We launched Lost At E Minor back in 2005. At the time, we had NO idea that the site would amount to anything more than a fun hobby and an easy way for us to give props to the many talented artists, musicians, and other creative types that were inspiring us every day. But as interest in Lost At E Minor grew, we decided to move the site design away from the very simple WordPress theme we had for the first couple of years and reshape the site in a way that was (we think) slightly ahead of the online design trends of that period.

That was in 2008, and that site design – with its edgy colour combos (for the time) and content heavy approach served us well. The content popped out of the site design and traffic grew quickly on the back of the relaunch. There were issues though with the look of the site which became more apparent as the years passed. The site was slow. We realised we needed to strip things back and let the content sit forward.

This was the way forward. Lost At E Minor suddenly starting looking too busy, the images were getting lost amongst all the other content, and there was a lack of clear visual hierarchy in the site structure. That design had enjoyed a great run, but it was time for a change.

And we had very strong ideas of what we wanted from the new (improved) Lost At E Minor; much bigger photos, easier to read copy, less visual clutter, a clear heirarchy of order, a simpler design that put the most recent content front and centre, but also paid homage to the non-timely posts of the past. And we wanted the site to be faster, faster, faster!

The wire-framing was done inhouse, lead by our talented Digital Producer, Elise Boyd. Once we had it to a point we were happy with, we handed it over to our favourite Australian designer who had so effectively shaped Lost At E Minor’s previous incarnation, Andrew ‘Whitey’ Whitehead.

In his own words, this is how he approached the task we set him:

‘The challenge for designing a site like Lost At E Minor is to allow the beautiful content to speak for itself. It’s not about the frame we’re designing or the container we’re delivering it in, but rather the artwork, the illustrations or the photos from artists, designers, travellers and internet foragers alike.

Our redesign had a number of key goals; make content the singular focus, increase the size of all images, reduce the load time, bring social to the fore and overarchingly, deliver a new fresh experience’. And so here we are, today, after months of work, unveiling something that we are all very proud of.

We have bugs. The msite is not yet live. But we have a new site and these things will be ironed out in the coming days.

Please help us by sharing your views on the Lost At E Minor visual makeover. What works? What doesn’t?

Let us know with a comment below this post, or contact us direct.